Activity Book 1 - Text

  1. Planisphere
  2. Build Your Own Water Filter
  3. Luminous Water
  4. The Colour Spectrum
  5. Locating Magnetic North
  6. Build Your Own Volcano
  7. Do Fish Drink Water?
  8. Water Pressure - How Great Is It?
  9. The Effect of Acid Rain on Green Plants
  10. Mystery Phrase
  11. Jumble Words
  12. Recipes
  13. Word Searches
  14. Careers in Agriculture - Crossword Puzzle
  15. How Dirty is the Air?
  16. Price Game
  17. Money Puzzle

Planisphere

National Research Council

The night sky is an exciting place!

Construct your own Planisphere and use it to map the sky above you.

The planisphere oval represents a 'window' of the night sky for most Canadians (Canadians living between 45º and 55º latitude). For each day of the year, the position of the stars and constellations is shown for Midnight, not taking into consideration Daylight Saving Time, which varies from province to province. Therefore, you may notice slight adjustments in the exact position of the stars in Canadian night skies.

The constellations close to the Southern Horizon will be in front of you when you look southward. Similarly, the stars close to the Northern Horizon will be in front of you when you look northward (Don't know how to locate North, South, East and West? Have a look for the "Locating Magnetic North" activity in this book to help you find them!). The same rule applies for constellations close to the Eastern and Western Horizons. The stars in the middle of the oval will be directly over your head.

Materials

  • Scissors
  • Planisphere

What to do

  1. Cut out the Planisphere from your booklet.
  2. Follow the instructions on the Planisphere tabs to put yours together.
  3. Go outside on a clear night. Use the Planisphere to help you find constellations!

Discussion

  • Once you've found the constellations, see how much you know about them.
  • What do their shapes represent? Where do their names come from?
  • Have your group do some research and share the stories of the night sky!

top of page


Build Your Own Water Filter

Canadian Space Agency

Since water is a rare commodity in space, astronauts on the International Space Station recycle all the water they use. This includes sweat, shower and shaving water, even urine! This wastewater is purified and then recycled for drinking and other uses.

To understand how water filtration works, try this activity. (Note: This experiment only demonstrates a type of water filtration. The experiment will not purify water for drinking purposes.)

Materials

  • Clear plastic pop bottle (2 litres)
  • Aquarium gravel
  • Sand
  • Aquarium charcoal (activated)
  • Cheesecloth (a nylon stocking can also be used)
  • Muddy water
  • Rubber bands

What to do

  1. Cut the bottom off the pop bottle. Cover the mouth of the bottle with several layers of cheesecloth and secure the cloth with a rubber band. Suspend the bottle upside down with its mouth over a container to catch the filtered water.
  2. Using the hole cut in the bottom, fill the bottle with charcoal to a depth of 5-8 cm.
  3. Place 8 - 10 cm of sand on top of the charcoal.
  4. Add another 5 - 8 cm of gravel on top of the sand.
  5. Stir the muddy water and pour it into the filter. Watch closely as the water seeps down through the three filtering layers of gravel, sand, and charcoal.

Discussion

  • What happened to the water while it passed through the different layers of the filter?
  • Compare the muddy water to the filtered water. Is there a difference?
  • Would it make a difference if one of the layers had been left out?

top of page


Luminous Water

Canadian Space Agency

Water and glass can act as obstacles, causing light to deviate or change direction. This experiment is a good way to demonstrate what happens.

Materials

  • Scissors
  • Clear plastic bottle
  • Water
  • Flat dish
  • Small flashlight

What to do

  1. Use the scissors to poke a small hole in the bottom third on the side of the bottle. With your finger on the hole, fill the bottle with water. Place the bottle on the dish and turn off the lights in the room.
  2. Let the water trickle out of the hole into the dish. Shine the beam of the flashlight around the bottle, level with the hole. If the beam is properly positioned, the water trickling from the bottle should become luminous. Even the water in the dish should emit light.

top of page


The Colour Spectrum

Canadian Space Agency

Light may look transparent, but it actually consists of many colours - red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and purple. These different colours are called the Colour Spectrum and were first understood by Isaac Newton. Here's an experiment that demonstrates the colour spectrum.

Materials

  • Black paper
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Flashlight
  • Clear plastic box (a Tupperware container works)
  • Mirror
  • Thick white paper

What to do

  1. Make a small notch in the black paper and tape it to the glass part of the flashlight.
  2. Pour water into the box to the halfway point. Stand the mirror up in the water against one side of the box.
  3. Turn off the lights and focus the beam of the flashlight on the part of the mirror that's submerged.
  4. Hold a sheet of white paper so that it reflects the light. The colours of the rainbow will appear on the sheet of paper.

top of page


Locating Magnetic North

Canadian Space Agency

The Earth is like a great big magnet that forces all the other magnets to point to magnetic north at the top of the world. Here are a couple of experiments that involve locating magnetic north.

  1. Observing Shadows
    Go outside on a sunny day, around noon, and observe which way your shadow is pointing. Shadows point northward because Canada is located in the Northern Hemisphere. If we lived in the Southern Hemisphere, our shadows would point southward.
  2. Making a Compass

Step A

Materials

  • Bar-shaped magnet
  • Tape
  • Small plastic container
  • Bowl
  • Water
  • Stick-on labels

What to do

  1. Tape the magnet flat in the middle of the small plastic container.
  2. Fill the bowl with water and float the container in the bowl.
  3. Once the container stops moving, mark the edge of the bowl with two labels opposite either end of the magnet - one for north and one for south.

Proceed to step B to see which is north.

Step B

Materials

  • Piece of cardboard
  • Pen
  • Scissors

What to do

  1. Cut out a circle of cardboard the same size as the opening of the small plastic container.
  2. Draw a cross on the cardboard. At each of the four points, moving clockwise, write the first letter of the cardinal points - N (north), E (east), S (south), W (west).
  3. Place the cardboard on the container so that the N is opposite one of the labels. As you turn the container slightly, you can see that the magnet keeps turning back to face north. Place the N at that mark. Once the magnet stops moving, the compass will show the cardinal points.

top of page


Build Your Own Volcano

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Step A - Salt dough

Materials

  • 6 cups of flour
  • 2 cups of salt
  • 4 tablespoons of cooking oil
  • 2 cups of water

What to do

  1. Mix the ingredients together with your hands until the dough is smooth and firm. Feel free to add a little more water to the mixture if needed.

Step B - Volcano

Materials

  • 2 litre pop bottle
  • 1 tablespoon of liquid detergent
  • Red food colouring
  • 1 cup of vinegar
  • Warm tap water
  • 2 tablespoons of baking soda
  • Baking sheet
  • Funnel

What to do

  1. Stand the clean soda bottle in the middle of the baking sheet. Mould the salt dough around the bottle, making sure that you don't cover up the bottle mouth (the hole at the top) or drop any dough into the bottle. Take your time and build the volcano of your dreams.
  2. Once you are done the exterior of your volcano you can begin to mix your lava! Start by filling the bottle most of the way with warm water. Make sure to leave enough room for the rest of your ingredients!
  3. Next, use the funnel to add 1 tablespoon of liquid detergent into the bottle.
  4. Add a couple drops of red food colouring.
  5. Add 2 tablespoons of baking soda to the water/detergent mixture in the bottle.
  6. Slowly pour 1 cup of vinegar into the bottle and jump back!

Discussion

When baking soda is mixed with vinegar a chemical reaction takes place and carbon dioxide is produced - the same gas that bubbles in a real volcano! Since carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air it pushes the air out of the bottle. The detergent in the bottle creates bubbles and the food colouring adds colour to the "eruption". Although real volcanoes don't have the same ingredients as this activity, their behaviour is somewhat similar.

top of page


Do Fish Drink Water?

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

In saltwater, salt moves from areas of high concentration to areas of low concentration. Similarly, if something blocks the salt from moving (but not the water) the water moves from the low salt areas to the high salt areas. This is osmosis.

All creatures living in water are adapted to the effects of osmosis. Seawater has a higher salt concentration than the body fluids of fish. Therefore, the water in seawater fish is constantly being lost to the sea. These fish have to drink continually to replenish their water supply, urinate very little, and push salt out through their gills.

Freshwater has a lower salt concentration than the body fluids of fish. Fish living in freshwater never drink. Therefore, freshwater tends to flow into their bodies, in an attempt to increase its salt concentrations. Consequently, freshwater fish never drink; if they drank even a little, they would swell up.

Materials

  • 2 glass jars
  • Raisins
  • Salt
  • Teaspoon
  • Measuring cup
  • Label (paper or tape)
  • Pencil
  • Knife (optional)

What to do

  1. Fill two glass jars with water and label one saltwater and the other one freshwater.
  2. Add salt to one jar and stir until dissolved - a teaspoonful of salt to 250 ml of water.
  3. Add a handful of raisins to each jar. Keep a handful of raisins dry for comparison.
  4. Let stand for an hour.
  5. Observe the raisins.

Discussion

  • What happens to the raisins in the freshwater?
  • What would happen to freshwater fish if they drank water?
  • What happens to the raisins in the saltwater?
  • What would happen to fish in saltwater that did not drink a lot?
  • What would happen to you if you drank saltwater?

top of page


Water Pressure - How Great Is It?

Parks Canada

Materials

  • Hammer and nail
  • Large empty juice can
  • Container of water
  • Dish pan to catch water
  • Tape

What to do

  1. Use the hammer and nail to make three holes in a straight vertical line at the top, middle and bottom of the can.
  2. Place one piece of tape so it covers all three holes.
  3. Discuss what you think will happen when you remove the tape from the can. Will the water come out of each of the holes in the same way? Why/Why not?
  4. Holding the can upright, pull the tape off. Observe the flow of the water streams coming out of the can. Is there a difference? Which hole makes the longest stream of water? Why?

Discussion

The bottom stream shoots out the farthest because it is being pushed down by the weight of the water above. The bottom stream is under the highest pressure, whereas the stream at the top is under the lowest pressure.

top of page


The Effect of Acid Rain on Green Plants

Statistics Canada

This activity requires a few special ingredients and weather (rain), so be sure to plan ahead!

Materials

  • Two clear plastic or glass jars with wide mouths and screw-top covers (peanut butter or mason jars work well)
  • Litmus paper
  • Litmus paper colour-matching chart for determining acidity
  • Two green plants

What to do

  1. Label your jars “A” and “B”.
  2. In jar "A" collect rain water as it falls from the sky. Screw on the cover.
  3. Fill jar "B" with your regular tap water. Screw on the cover. (Jar "B" is a control)
  4. Dip litmus paper into jar "A". Use the colour chart to determine whether the rain water is acidic, alkaline or neutral (pH balanced)?
  5. Repeat step 3 for the tap water.
  6. Take note of your results.
  7. If the rain water is found to be acidic, place a few drops each day for five days on live plant leaves. Do the same with the pH balanced alkaline tap water on the leaves of the other plant. Compare the two plants.

Discussion

What might be the result of frequent acid rain falling on a forest?

top of page


Mystery Phrase

Natural Resources Canada

How to play:

In the following table, each symbol represents two letters. Use the following codes to find the mystery phrase.

 

< ! = > @ % % ? $ %

= @ 0 % @ ? # = # = %

& @ ^ # 0 @ @ =

Mystery phrase
Symbol!@#$%^&0?<>=-
First letter A B C D E F G H I J K L M
Second letter N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

top of page


Jumble Words

Natural Resources Canada

Unscramble the following words and, using the highlighted letters, find the secret word!

Y G R E N C L C I

I T A N - G D L N I I

G G T H I L I N

M S T C O P O

R O T H S E T M T A

R U N T F O F

Y E R E G N

 

Secret word:

7 letters

top of page


Recipes

Public Health Agency of Canada

Note: be sure to check for allergies before making these recipes, some contain nuts!

We all know that eating well is an important part of keeping our bodies happy and healthy. Try these fun and delicious recipes for a great way to boost your energy!

Ants on a Log

Ingredients

  • Celery stalks
  • Peanut butter
  • Raisins
  • Knife

What to do

  1. Wash your celery in clean water.
  2. Spread the peanut butter on the celery stalk.
  3. Sprinkle with raisins.

Variations: Use sunflower seeds or currants instead of raisins. Use cheese spread instead of peanut butter

Polar Bear Drink

Ingredients

  • 250 ml Chocolate milk
  • 1 Banana
  • Strawberries
  • Blender
  • Wax paper
  • Freezer
  • Measuring cup

What to do

  1. Half peel a banana. Lay it on the waxed paper and freeze it for about 30 minutes in the freezer.
  2. Take the frozen banana out and peel completely. Mix it in the blender with the chocolate milk.
  3. Place a strawberry on top!

Over the Rockies Trail Mix

Ingredients

  • Cheerios or Shreddies
  • Dried apricots
  • Dried bananas
  • Dried pears
  • Dried apples
  • Raisins
  • Bowl or bag
  • Knife

What to do

  1. Cut up the dried fruit into small pieces.
  2. Mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl.

Variation: For those with a sweeter tooth, some chocolate covered peanuts make a tasty addition. Divide your Trail Mix into small baggies so everyone has their own easy-to-carry trail snack!

Gone Fishing!

Ingredients

  • 125 ml cream cheese
  • 2 drops of blue food colouring
  • 2 handfuls of pretzel sticks
  • 2 handfuls of goldfish shaped crackers

What to do

  1. Put the cream cheese into the bowl
  2. Using the spoon, mix in the food colouring. When it is mixed, spread it evenly around the bowl to create your pond.
  3. Sprinkle the pond with your goldfish crackers
  4. Now dip your fishing pole (pretzel) into the fishing pond and see what you get!

Tic-Tac-Toast

Ingredients

  • 1 slice of bread
  • 1 “singles” slice of cheese
  • 1 cheese string
  • 1 black olive
  • 1/4 red or green pepper
  • knife
  • toaster oven/oven
  • plate

What to do

  1. Put a slice of bread on a plate.
  2. Cover the bread with the slice of cheese
  3. Pull your cheese string into skinny strips and place them on the bread in a tic-tac-toe grid pattern.
  4. Cut up the olive for your O's.
  5. Cut up the green or red pepper into strips to make your X's.
  6. Place your X's and O's on your bread.
  7. Melt the cheese under the broiler and before you know it, you will have TIC-TAC-TOAST!

top of page


Word Searches

Transport Canada

Take a break and relax with these transport-related word searches to learn about transport in Canada - by Air, Rail, Water and Road!

Air Transport

Air Transport

AIRPORTS
BAGGAGE
BIRDS
CABIN
CARGO
CARRY-ON
DETECTOR
INSPECTORS
IDENTIFICATION
PILOTS
PRE-FLIGHT
SAFETY
SECURITY
REGISTRATION
TURBULENCE
WILDLIFE

Rail Transport

Rail Transport

CROSSINGS
DERAILMENT
FREIGHT
GATES
GRAIN
INSPECTIONS
INTERMODAL
LIGHTS
PASSENGERS
RAILWAY
SAFETY
STEAM
TRACKS
WHISTLE

 

Marine Transport

Marine Transport

BLUENOSE
CARGO
COAST GUARD
CRUISE
FERRIES
FISHING
INSPECTIONS
LIFEJACKETS
LIGHTHOUSE
MARINE
PILOTAGE
REGISTRATION
SHIP
TOUR BOATS

 

Road Transport

Road Transport

ACCIDENTS
AIRBAGS
ATV
BRIDGES
BUSES
CAR-POOLING
CARS
CAR SEATS
DRIVING
ENVIRONMENT
GASOLINE
HIGHWAYS
PASSENGERS
RECALLS
SAFETY
SEATBELTS
SNOWMOBILES
TRAFFIC
TRUCKS
URBAN

top of page


Careers in Agriculture - Crossword Puzzle

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Crossword puzzle

Across
1. A person who raises bees
5. A doctor who looks after animals
7. A scientist who works with chemicals
Down
2. A person who keeps machines and vehicles in good condition
3. A person who designs farm machinery or farm structures
4. An expert on crops and soils
6. Someone who drives goods to the market

 

 

top of page


How Dirty is the Air?

Health Canada

Try this experiment to find out about Particulate Matter. What is Particulate Matter? It's a fancy word for all the little things like dust, dirt, soot and smoke that surround us, but that are too small to see.

Materials

  • Coloured markers
  • White cardboard
  • Magnifying glasses
  • Labels (masking tape works as well)
  • 5 jar lids

What to do

  1. Write the numbers 1 through 5 on the labels, then attach a label to the top of each jar lid.
  2. Place the jar lids on a piece of white cardboard. Carefully trace the lids, then number these circles to match the numbers on the lids.
  3. Take the cardboard and lids outside. Place them flat in an open area. (Rain or high winds will spoil the experiment, so keep an eye on the weather reports!)
  4. At the end of the first day, remove one lid, starting with number one. For the next five days take away one lid each day. Are the circles different?
  5. At the end of the fifth day, take away the last lid and look at the circles. If the air is dirty, the circles covered by the low-numbered lids will have more specks of dirt than the others. Use a magnifying glass to count the dirt specks.

Discussion

Is our air clean or dirty?

top of page


Price Game

Industry Canada

This activity is designed to help you to determine the price of items you regularly use. It can be surprising to see how much some everyday items actually cost!

Materials

  • Various store catalogues and flyers
  • Pencils, pens or markers

 What to do

  1. Either individually or together, have your group put the price of the item, to the best of their knowledge, on the white price tags.
  2. Using flyers, catalogues, the internet, or by looking through cupboards at home or school, find the actual price of the items.
  3. Compare the results.

Discussion

Were items typically more or less expensive than the estimate price? Discuss the differences between a “want” and a “need”. Which items on the list are a “need”? Which are a “want”? Talk about the importance of setting a budget with your group.

Price Game
ItemsEstimated PriceActual Price
Pair of jeans    
Purse    
27-inch colour television    
Lawn Mower    
Hair dryer    
Pizza delivery    
Can of paint    
Lamp    
Video game    
Watch    

top of page


Money Puzzle

Industry Canada

Materials

  • Scissors

What to do

  1. Cut out the $5 bills to use as the pieces of your puzzle.
  2. Flip them over, and arrange them to make the image of a CD player

Discussion

The $5 bills represent part of your weekly allowance. You have been depositing these $5 bills in your bank account in order to buy a CD player that costs $50.

On the back of each bill, you will find a piece of the CD player you want. If you deposit $5 a week in your bank account, how many weeks will it take you to save the $50 needed for the CD player? The puzzle will help you find the answer.

top of page


Date modified: