Appendix C – Session Abstracts


Session 1A: The Canadian Ocean Science funding Seascape, Canada’s Granting Councils and Agencies

Challenge Area

Align Efforts, Plans, and Funding Around Shared Priorities

Session Leader

ORCA Secretariat

Additional Speakers

Elizabeth Boston, Mathematical, Environmental and Physical Sciences (NSERC)

Jacques Critchley, Research Grants & Partnerships (SSHRC)

Sandra Zohar, Canada Foundation for Innovation

Abstract

The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) supports university students in their advanced studies, promotes and supports discovery research, and fosters innovation by encouraging Canadian companies to participate and invest in postsecondary research projects. We will present an overview of NSERC programs supporting Ocean science and technology research, as well as funding trends over the last few years. Collaborative initiatives and networks will be highlighted, as well as opportunities for future national and international collaboration.

The Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) is Canada’s federal funding agency that promotes and supports postsecondary- based research and research training in the humanities and social sciences through grants, fellowships and scholarships. Across Canada and around the world, universities and colleges are changing, adapting and actively seeking to shape the evolving nature and scope of scientific research. Within the universities and outside, more researchers and research users of all stripes find that cross-sectoral collaborations, inter-agency and inter-departmental collaborations are increasingly essential to success and are, arguably, the new normal. SSHRC‘s current strategic plan, “Advancing Knowledge for Canada’s Future” (2016-2020) addresses these challenges and opportunities with three strategic objectives:

1. Enabling excellence in a changing research environment

2. Creating opportunities for research and training through collaborative initiatives

3. Connecting social sciences and humanities research with Canadians

These objectives align very well with the challenge to align efforts with shared priorities and we will emphasize the particular contribution that social science and social science funding can bring to ORCA.

The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) has invested close to $370 M in the past 20 years to support leading-edge ocean research infrastructure for over 250 projects. This investment also includes over $123 M for the operating and maintenance (O&M) of national research facilities awarded Major Science Initiatives (MSI) funds. The session will provide an overview of key CFI investments in infrastructure and O&M costs of ocean research projects and facilities, highlighting collaborations and networks (national and international). It will conclude with an update on the 2018 Federal Budget and the current suite of CFI funds.

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Session 1B: Canada’s Science Enterprise Centres: Partnering for Tomorrow’s Innovations

Challenge Area

Align Efforts, Plans, and Funding Around Shared Priorities

Session Leader

Anthony Redican – Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Additional Speakers

Anne Veniot – Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Steve MacDonald

Abstract

As part of the Government of Canada’s investments in marine and freshwater science, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) established multi-partner Science Enterprise Centres (SECs) at two DFO Facilities: the Gulf Fisheries Centre in Moncton, New Brunswick and the Centre for Aquaculture and Environmental Research (CAER) in West Vancouver, British Columbia. These Science Enterprise Centres are becoming innovative, collaborative research hubs fostering partnerships between the scientific and academic communities, Indigenous peoples, business groups, government partners, non-government organizations and the public.

When fully operational, the Science Enterprise Centres will be comprehensive, multi-purpose facilities and their objectives will be to establish world-class, innovative, multi-partner collaborations that advance priorities and deliver expanding science knowledge to Canadians.

This session will outline the goals and progress to date in establishing collaboration, outreach and governance models at both the Atlantic and Pacific SECs, including challenges that have been encountered and opportunities for further collaboration. The session will also include a discussion on current barriers to collaboration with a goal to identifying potential innovative solutions to move past these barriers.

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Session 1C: Networking the networks: fostering collaboration and coordination among ocean research and management networks to meet Canadian and international priorities

Challenge Area

Align Efforts, Plans, and Funding Around Shared Priorities

Session Leader

Sara Iverson, Ocean Tracking Network

Additional Speakers

Fred Whoriskey, Ocean Tracking Network

Leah Braithwaite, ArcticNet

Sana Kavanagh, Mi’kmaw Conservation Group

Abstract

To provide evidence on which to base complex science, policy and management strategies for oceans and aquatic resources, nations are turning to large multi-disciplinary networks that unite researchers from the natural and social sciences and draw on academia, industry, government, indigenous groups and local communities. Canada has invested in a number of world-class ocean networks that provide integrated knowledge about key interests and greatly build on existing strengths. These networks – even when pan-Canadian or globally reaching – address specialized and well- defined problems and collect different types of data. Yet they may also overlap: in geographic areas, equipment used, and in analytical approaches that would benefit immensely – and provide new insights into big problems – from better collaborations and new alignments among the networks. The Canadian Council of Academies acknowledged the importance and strengths of Canada’s ocean networks, but also emphasized the need to better coordinate investments of public resources to benefit Canada and Canadians by moving knowledge into policy and management.

The aim of this ORCA session is to provide examples of Canada’s existing ocean networks, and to share thoughts on opportunities for better alignment and coordination of these networks. We bring together a panel of representatives from three ocean-centered networks who will provide brief perspectives on the benefits obtained from their networking activities, but also the challenges and lessons learned in attempting to reach out beyond their networks both nationally and internationally, in moving knowledge into policy and management spheres, and especially in helping to identify new opportunities for synergies and integration among networks. An open forum with the general audience will provide an opportunity to identify additional examples of networking successes and challenges, discuss ways to increase alignment, collaboration and coordination among networks nationally and internationally, and identify initiatives that fill gaps in priority areas of ocean research and management.

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Session 2A: Coordinated and Collaborative Ocean Observation

Challenge Area

Advance the Sharing of Infrastructure

Session Leader

Brad deYoung – Memorial University of Newfoundland

Additional

Speakers

Keith Lennon – Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Carl Gouldman – U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS)

Abstract

This session will review and discuss the benefits and challenges of coordinated and collaborative ocean observing. To improve our stewardship of the ocean, and prepare for, or avoid future hazards, we need better ocean observations and understanding. We have many ocean observation activities and much infrastructure in Canada, and these are loosely-aligned and many are not sustainable. On a national scale, our programs need coordination to bring together the data from many sources: buoys measuring wind and waves, ships surveying fish stocks, and satellites providing the view from above. Our investment in ocean observing will only payoff with better coordination and collaboration. Ocean issues cut across regions and national borders and require an integrative, ambitious approach that is fit for the intended purpose.

We will begin with the Atlantic Ocean BluePrint an international initiative to lay out the principles and plans for sustained ocean observing in the North and South Atlantic. We will learn from the development of the US IOOS program which has been in operation for almost a decade. The discussion of the challenges and benefits will lead to a review of the present state of Canadian ocean observing and plans for the Canadian Integrated Ocean Observing System being led by Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

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Session 2B: Increasing Vessel Capacity for Canadian At-Sea Research – Part 1: Collaborative Initiatives

Challenge Area

Advance the Sharing of Infrastructure

Session Leader

Douglas Wallace, MEOPAR

Additional Speakers

Guy Levesque, Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Keith Levesque, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Jennifer Vollrath, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Louis Fortier, Amundsen Science, ArcticNet

Doug Bancroft, Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility (CSSF)

Abstract

The session will focus on research vessel capacity across Canada, with a special focus on vessels that can support multidisciplinary research and complex deployments in Canada’s Arctic and offshore. The panelists will briefly define the existing situation and prognosis; identify plans and opportunities for new approaches to increasing research vessel capacity, and suggest the next concrete steps that need to be taken.

New approaches will include plans for purpose-built research icebreaker capacity, modular infrastructure to allow use of a range of platforms and vessels and opportunities associated with Canada’s new Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships.

The session is linked directly with the follow-on session which will be focussed on cooperative approaches to the sharing and operation of large ocean infrastructure.

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Session 2C: Increasing Vessel Capacity for Canadian At-Sea Research – Part 2: Strategic Approaches

Challenge Area

Advance the Sharing of Infrastructure

Session Leaders

Keith Levesque, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Jennifer Vollrath, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Additional Speakers

Alexandre Forest, Amundsen Science

Abstract

Research vessels are a critical component of ocean research infrastructure. In Canada, new and increasing demands for scientific observations and advice are coinciding with declining infrastructure capacity. This situation stresses the need for a national-level mechanism to better coordinate access to existing research vessels across ocean research organizations and for a shared strategic vision for the operation of current and new infrastructure.

Infrastructure coordination and sharing is not new – key examples of how ocean science communities have come together to pool resources and work collaboratively will be presented. The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has developed an online tool for allocating and scheduling its research vessels in a way that maximizes use across all NOAA sectors and with its scientific collaborators. In Europe, strategies such as the international Arctic Research Icebreakers (ARICE) and EUROFLEETS consortia have been developed to address the challenges of coordinating transnational activities and scarce ocean science resources. In Canada, the scientific deployment of the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen is managed by the independent organization Amundsen Science that allows researchers from all horizons to access the ship.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is currently developing an online application to coordinate access to and facilitate the sharing of Canadian marine research infrastructures for both governmental and academic researchers and will offer efficiency and transparency in the process for submitting and evaluating applications for ship time. Information on the rationale and functionalities of the application will be provided.

This session will delve into additional questions regarding the current model of funding, sharing and operating research vessels in Canada and what is required to take a strategic approach to fruition.

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Session 2D: Infrastructure for the Future

Challenge Area

Advance the Sharing of Infrastructure

Session Leader

Brad deYoung – Memorial University of Newfoundland

Additional Speakers

Richard Dewey – Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) Blair Greenan – Fisheries and Oceans Canada

David Fissel - ASL Environmental Sciences

Abstract

Our ability to make ocean measurements has greatly expanded over the past several decades. We have many new platforms to reach the ocean and sensors that can now reach beyond temperature and salinity to chlorophyll, nutrients and other biogeochemical and biological properties. We now face the challenge of having to decide which properties to measure and how best to deploy the range of technology available to us. In Canada, we also must work to better share the systems that we do have that are spread across the geography and the institutions that we have from the governmental, private to academic sector.

In this session we will review some of our present capability for fixed and mobile measurements, consider some of the sensors present under development and the opportunities for the future. We will consider the regional networks (ONC, Ocean Tracking Network, Saint Lawrence Global Observatory, and HF radar), mobile platforms (Gliders, Argo, BioArgo, Autonomous Underwater Vehicles) and sensor technologies (gas, nutrient, pH). We will review some of the approaches to infrastructure sharing such as the ROPOS facility, and Ocean Gliders Canada. The discussion will focus on strategies for improved collaboration and sharing. How can we get better value from the intellectual and financial investments that we have made in ocean technology?

What are the key gaps in ocean observation and how should they be addressed? How can we develop more effective cross-sectoral partnerships between academia and the industry and government sectors?

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Session 2E: Pan-Canadian Issues in Data Management

Challenge Area

Advance the Sharing of Infrastructure

Session Leader

David Castle, University of Victoria

Additional Speakers

Fred Whoriskey, Ocean Tracking Network Benoit Pirenne, Ocean Networks Canada

Geoff Munro, Trestle Networks

Abstract:

Ocean science increasingly relies on sophisticated sensing technologies producing large volumes of data that needs to be standardized, quality controlled, discoverable, and accessible. This panel first considers the Canadian context for research data management (through the lens of Research Data Canada) before exploring east and west coast-based initiatives (Ocean Tracking Network and Ocean Networks Canada), and then concluding with a discussion of federal science (Government of Canada Science Network). The major thematic elements covered in this session will include the case for harmonized national approaches to ocean data management, coordination and communication aspects of research data management, international standards and Canadian leadership, and the potential for university- industry-government partnership in ocean data science.

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Session 3A: Government of Canada Priorities Requiring Ocean Science and Technology Advice

Challenge Area

Science in Support of Public Policy, Regulation and Decision-making

Session Leader

Andrew Brammer, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Additional Speakers

Alain Leclair, Polar Knowledge Canada

Candace Newman, Natural Resources Canada

Jean-François Bibeault, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Wayne Moore, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Abstract

A key requirement for the successful fostering of more effective collaboration across the entirety of the Canadian ocean science ecosystem will be to improve the overall alignment between the products of research programming produced by ocean science practitioners, and the information and advice required by managers and policy-makers in support of regulations and decision-making.

In this session, federal departments who make use of ocean science and technology research products will discuss priority areas whose successful advancement will be underpinned by the availability of supporting ocean science and technology advice.

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Session 3B: Arctic Ocean Science: Forward Looking Requirements

Challenge Area

Science in Support of Public Policy, Regulation and Decision-making

Session Leader

David Scott, Polar Knowledge Canada

Additional Speakers

Brian Burke, Nunavut Fisheries Association Peter Harrison, Queen’s University

David Jackson, Canadian Ice Service, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Abstract:

As the climate warms and open water in the Arctic Ocean becomes more prevalent, new challenges emerge, and the policy and regulatory environments need to keep pace. This session explores the emerging knowledge gaps, the policy questions, and research requirements and challenges for the Arctic ocean, from the perspectives of northerners and other Arctic ocean knowledge experts. Trends in the current fisheries in the western and eastern regions of our Arctic will be examined, and key questions identified. Issues related to potential future activities in the Central Arctic Ocean will be highlighted and assessed, and key knowledge gaps explored. Changing sea ice dynamics that influence harvesting and safe seasonal transportation will be highlighted, and linked to current and possible future challenges.

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Session 3C: Integrating Seabed Geoscience into Marine Spatial Planning

Challenge Area

Science in Support of Public Policy, Regulation and Decision-making

Session Leader

Philip Hill, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

Additional Speakers

Stephen Locke, NRCan

Craig Brown, Nova Scotia Community College

Abstract

Understanding the geological characteristics of the seabed and underlying strata provides important framework information for marine spatial planning. Typically based on morphological analysis of multibeam sonar bathymetry models and backscatter data, the geological characterization of the seafloor provides information on the composition, structure, stability and sensitivity of the seafloor. Geological mapping contributes to cumulative effects management by providing evidence of the physical processes that shape the seafloor and the natural pathways for sediment and contaminants, from source to final deposition. Integrating geological information into marine spatial planning and issues management requires a culture of collaboration that is presently only partially developed at the local level, but is not systematically supported by public policy.

This session will bring together geological, physical and biological oceanographers, as well as ocean managers to discuss the issues related to integrating seabed geological mapping into marine spatial planning initiatives.

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Session 4A: Opportunities for Collaboration among Ocean Technology Organizations and Initiatives

Challenge Area

Encourage Innovation and Commercialisation of Knowledge and Technology

Session Leader

Scott McLean, Ocean Technology Alliance of Canada

Additional Speakers

Jim Hanlon, Centre for Ocean Ventures Enterprise

Michelle Wheatley, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Abstract

This session will look at some of the major new initiatives in Canada that will provide significant opportunities for collaboration in the ocean technology sector nationally. Session speakers will provide a 10-15 minute overview of these new initiatives and where there are opportunities for collaboration between industry, academic and government organizations.

Session speakers and Topics:

Scott McLean: The Ocean Technology Alliance Canada

Jim Hanlon: Canada’s Ocean Supercluster

Michelle Wheatley: The Oceans Protection Plan

After the presentations and Q&A, there will be a round table discussion.

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Session 4B: National Challenges in Marine Technology Development

Challenge Area

Encourage Innovation and Commercialisation of Knowledge and Technology

Session Leader

David Fissel, Director, Ocean Technology Alliance of Canada

Additional Speakers

Dr. David Murrin; National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Dr. Greg Johnson, RBR Limited

Martin Taillefer, Maritime Way Scientific

Abstract

This session will address the challenges in marine technology development in Canada. Specifically, this session will seek to arrive at better understandings of some of the issues which can be addressed to enhance the commercialization of ocean knowledge and technology in Canada. Specific aspects of this topic include improved communication and coordination mechanisms among Canadian Ocean S&T enterprises. The session will seek to identify, within the broader Canadian Ocean S&T community, of national challenges to be addressed and new marine technologies to be developed and tested through science- engineering cooperation.

The speakers, and their topics, are:

David Fissel: An Overview of the Priorities for New Marine Technologies based on an earlier study by the Canadian Council of Academies with updates based on more recent studies.

David Murrin: How present and future NRC programs align with Canadian Ocean Science, Engineering and Technology Development

Greg Johnson and Martin Taillefer: Challenges for technology development by Canadian Ocean Science and Technology (S&T) SME’s; how can improved collaboration and coordination of ocean S&T benefit technology development?

The panel discussion will be followed by a Q&A session from the audience.

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Session 4C: Ocean technology Opportunities for Canada

Challenge Area

Encourage Innovation and Commercialisation of Knowledge and

Technology

Session Leaders

Gordon Gale, Executive Director, Ocean Technology Council of Nova Scotia

Noémie Giguère, Executive Director, Technopole maritime du Québec

Additional Speakers

Dr Sue Malloy, GlasOcean

Jeff Stockhausen, National Research Council of Canada

Abstract

Ocean Technology should be regarded as an overarching or horizontal sector. Ocean Tech is inherent in a number of classical vertical sectors such as marine defence and security, ocean observation, marine energy (both renewables and extractive), marine transportation, marine tourism, capture fisheries and aquaculture. As such a number of specific supply chains can be identified in these vertical sectors; Offshore oil and subsea, defence surveillance, Ocean Science, Shipbuilding and onboard systems, biotechnology, and fisheries and aquaculture. Key target market geographic regions and key market trends and demand drivers will be identified.

This session will include a series of presentations, followed by a round-table discussion.

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Session 5A: Horizon 2020 - the European Union Framework Programme for Research and Innovation - an Ocean of Opportunity for Collaboration

Challenge Area

Work Towards a Cohesive Voice for the Ocean Science Community in International Fora

Session Leader

Sigi Gruber, Head of Marine resources Unit, Bioeconomy

Directorate, Research and Innovation, European Commission

Additional Speakers

N/A

Abstract

This session will illustrate why Canadian researchers, ocean stakeholders, representatives from the public and private sector should engage in collaborative endeavours with Europe and globally thanks to the Horizon 2020 Programme (the European Union's biggest Research and Innovation Framework Programme with nearly EUR 80 billion of funding available over 7 years).

The Canada - European Union - United States Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance (AORA), established by the Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation, provides a framework for creating opportunities across and along the Atlantic Ocean.

Don’t miss your chance to discover and engage in the discussion!

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Session 5B: Breaking down the silo mentality is key to advancing the goals of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Sciences

Challenge Area

Work towards a cohesive voice for the ocean science community in international fora

Session Leader

Wendy Watson-Wright, CEO of the Ocean Frontier Institute

Additional Speakers

Moderator:

Arran McPherson, ADM, Ecosystems and Oceans Science, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Panelists:

Brad deYoung, Robert A. Bartlett Professor of Oceanography at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St. John’s, NL

Peter Heffernan, Chief Executive, Marine Institute, Galway, Ireland

Catherine Lambert Koizumi, Executive Director, Mi’gmaq Maliseet Aboriginal Fisheries Management Association, Gesgapegiag, QC

Abstract

During the 72nd United Nations General Assembly — held in 2017— it was proclaimed that years 2021 to 2030 would be the Decade of Ocean Sciences for Sustainable Development. The intent of the proclamation is to reverse the decline in ocean health by identifying actions that will ensure marine environments are developed in a sustainable way. Key to achieving the UN’s objectives for the decade is applying solutions in a collaborative and global manner. This session will examine three ways in which an integrated and cooperative approach is effectively resolving challenges to our ocean:

The session will include an overview of the objectives the United Nations expects to achieve during the Decade of Ocean Sciences for Sustainable Development as well as an interactive audience discussion on the various solutions that could be applied.

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Session 5C: Challenges and Opportunities for Canadian Engagement in International Ocean Science

Challenge Area

Work towards a cohesive voice for the ocean science community in international fora

Session Leader

Lynda Watson, Executive Director, Science Technology and Innovation, Global Affairs Canada

Additional Speakers

Panelists:

Nadia Bouffard, Director General, External Relations, Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Laird Hindle, Deputy Director, Development, Global Affairs Canada

Peter Aikat, Senior Innovation Officer, Science Technology and Innovation, Global Affairs Canada

Abstract

N/A

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Session 6A: ORCA's Community Platform for Facilitating Communication and Collaboration

Challenge Area

Communicating Ocean Science and Technology

Session Leader

Britt Dupuis, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, ORCA Secretariat

Additional Speakers

N/A

Abstract

The Oceans Research in Canada Alliance operates a new collaboration space which is the central hub for its Community of Practice and their activities. This SharePoint site has been designed to facilitate and support a highly collaborative and coordinated approach to ocean science and technology in Canada. It seeks to address several key challenges and barriers to coordination that have been identified by the community, by increasing transparency, communication and collaboration, in a way that is inclusive, flexible and resilient.

This web-based platform is a living tool that can support and facilitate your activities as you work with your partners to advance ocean science and technology in your field. It is community owned and community driven. This limited access space that can help you collaborate on shared documents from your working group, find panelists for your meetings, consult the community on specific issues, identify potential research partners, plug in to upcoming events, and more. The vision is that this site will become the one- stop-shop for collaborative work in Canadian ocean science.

While this site continues to evolve to meet the needs of the community, it is a free, highly collaborative and functional tool available to the community right now. This interactive session is your introduction and your chance to shape this tool for the future.

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Session 6B: Making sense of science for Canadians – improving science communication and engagement for greater research impact

Challenge Area

Communicating Ocean Science and Technology

Session Leader

Tara Donaghy, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, ORCA Secretariat

Additional Speakers

Sophie Malavoy, Director of Coeur des sciences – a scientific cultural centre

Dariusz Burzinski, Manager, S&T Cluster, Innovation, Science and

Economic Development Canada

Abstract

This session will focus on how the ORCA community can work together to improve the effectiveness and impact of our science communication with Canadians.

Sophie Malavoy will share her observations and advice about how to overcome some of the common challenges faced by science professionals when communicating research results, uncertainties, and risk.

Dariusz Burzynski will showcase existing and evolving efforts to bring together federal science and technology departments/agencies and professionals as a community in communicating federal science and connecting with Canadians.

The second half of the session will include a group discussion on how this community can collaborate to improve how we share scientific knowledge and engage with Canadians.

Questions to be addressed in the session include:

What are the barriers to communicating science with others?

Which tools/initiatives/best practices could we build on as a community to improve the effectiveness of our collective science communications?

How can this community support individual scientists in their efforts to help others better understand and act on research insights?

What are some ‘quick-win’ activities/initiatives over the next 12- 18 months that this community could endorse and/or engage in together?

We all have a role to play – both individually and collectively - in ensuring that our science matters to Canadians. Please come and contribute your thoughts and expertise this discussion.

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Session 6C: A National Roadmap for Ocean Literacy: A Critical Pathway for Mobilizing Ocean Science Knowledge

Challenge Area

Communicate Ocean Science and Technology

Session Leaders

Tara Donaghy, Fisheries and Oceans Canada Janet Stalker, Ocean School

Heather Murray, CaNOE

Additional Speakers

Lisa (Diz) Glithero, C3 Expedition and Students on Ice

Abstract

This session will focus on how to increase the effective communication of ocean science and technology knowledge and how to collaborate across specific sectors of influence to find new ways to advance understanding of oceans by the general public. You will have an opportunity to provide input on an initial Ocean Literacy Roadmap as we move forward on a national strategy for advancing ocean literacy in Canada.

The concept of ocean literacy (OL) ties together the scientific, socio- economic, and cultural dimensions of the human relationship with the ocean, and is strongly linked to ocean-positive behaviours and informed decision-making. Strategically developing ocean literacy activities in Canada, and around the world, is essential for making progress towards almost all UN Sustainable Development Goal 14 targets and for establishing a sustainable human-ocean dynamic.

DFO has supported the development of an initial “roadmap” for strategically advancing ocean literacy in Canada. This session will provide valuable feedback from the ocean science research and technology community and other subject matter experts to create a revised draft of the roadmap before it is shared publicly for a final round of broad consultation and revision.

Questions to be addressed in the session include:

What motivates scientist participation in OL activities?

What are the barriers to scientist participation?

What incentives/pathways/solutions/actions would bolster the ocean science community’s contribution to advancing ocean literacy in Canada?

What are effective ways for project organizers to get input from the ocean science community on this initiative?

Come and contribute your thoughts and expertise to this collaborative project and help Canada keep pace with international efforts in ocean literacy and conservation as we prepare for the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development in 2021-30.

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