Biographies

Robert Anderson

Robert Anderson

"I am generally interested in insect ecology and classification. My special research interests and expertise are in the order Coleoptera (beetles), and especially the weevils.  I am currently working at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa as a Research Scientist in Entomology. I have travelled extensively in Central and South America and have published almost 100 papers on weevil biology and classification.  At present I am also an adjunct professor in the Department of Natural Resources Sciences in McGill University in Montreal."

 


Craig Ayre

Craig Ayre

Craig Ayre is a graduate student of Biochemistry from Memorial University of Newfoundland. After receiving his B.Sc, he moved to the State of Qatar, an emirate in the middle-east, where he taught as a laboratory instructor in Chemistry and Biology for 4 years with the College of the North Atlantic while completing a B.Ed in Adult Education.

In 2011, Craig returned to Canada to pursue graduate studies. Currently he is involved in a bioinformatics-based research project investigating the control of apoptosis in B-cells under Dr. Sherri Christian. Craig lives in St. John’s, Newfoundland with his wife, Laura.

 


Pauline Barmby

Pauline Barmby

Pauline Barmby grew up in Ontario and BC and attended UBC in Vancouver. After receiving her PhD from Harvard University she worked at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and was involved in the testing, calibration, and first discoveries with the IRAC camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope.

In 2007, she returned to Canada to become an assistant professor at the University of Western Ontario. Dr. Barmby lives in London with her husband, Canada Research Chair Dr. Charles McKenzie, and their son.

 


Nick Bellissimo

Nick Bellissimo

Nick Bellissimo is an Associate Professor in the School of Nutrition at Ryerson University. He is the Director of the Nutrition Discovery Labs (https://ndlabs.ca) which focuses on understanding how physiological and environmental factors contribute to appetite and energy imbalances in children with the goal of providing a foundation for advice on diet composition, physical activity, and environment in preventing and managing overeating in children

He is the recipient of several competitive awards including the Dean’s Scholarly, Research and Creative Activity Award (2017), Sue Williams Excellence in Teaching Award (2016), and Dean’s Teaching Award (2014). He is also a member of several journal editorial boards, scientific adviser to government agencies and institutes, and the food industry.


Juan Beltran

Juan Beltran

Juan Beltran is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the Royal Military College of Canada.  The Beltran group at RMC provides experimental information relevant to thermodynamics, transport phenomena, kinetics and morphology of gas hydrates. Although gas hydrates or clathrates make the core of our research we love to find all kinds of creative applications for science and engineering.

Dr. Beltran holds a B. Eng, M. Eng and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from McGill University.

For more information: www.clathrate.ca

 


Lucien Junior Bergeron

Lucien Junior Bergeron

Lucien Junior Bergeron has a remarkable education in biochemistry and cellular and molecular biology. Having faced Hodgkin’s disease while working on his bachelor’s degree, his motivation for graduate studies in the health sciences is almost tangible. He is a biochemist by training, and won the thesis of the year in Health at the Université de Sherbrooke in 2005. While working on his doctorate, he engineered a catalytic RNA for the purposes of a future therapeutic tool. For this revolutionary concept he also received a prize from NSERC’s Innovation Challenge. Subsequently, he held various postdoctoral fellowships. In the first, at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, BC, he continued the study of the properties of nucleic acids. Then he went back to Sherbrooke to study functional genomics and the mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi and miRNA). He concluded with a clinical biochemistry fellowship aimed at linking basic and clinical research. He studied an RNA-binding protein found in human blood platelets, in relation to a hereditary genetic disease leading to Fragile X syndrome, an intellectual disability.

With all this experience behind him, he set up a scientific consulting service at the Université de Sherbrooke (an original, unique university service in Canada). After meeting several other challenges in extremely diverse areas of expertise (rheumatoid arthritis, DNA breakage, alternative reading frame, HIV, etc.), he became the scientific coordinator of the Réseau québécois de recherche en santé cardiométabolique, diabète et obésité (CMDO) of the Fonds de recherche Québec – Santé (FRQS), a network of several hundred researchers in the area of cardiometabolic health, diabetes and obesity. These are  research themes that concern society-wide diseases which are wreaking havoc. He has a an intense great desire to increase knowledge of these diseases through the network’s research results, which could benefit the Quebec population. Success requires multidisciplinarity with multi-centre activities that have led, through networking, to collaborations both in Quebec and internationally that otherwise would not have materialized. Dr. Bergeron has been nicknamed The Connector!

Lucien Junior Bergeron is currently Professor of Medicine and Rehabilitation (Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy) in the Faculty of Medicine and Health Science at the Université de Sherbrooke. He loves to take up challenges, so the Ask a Scientist activity is a perfect match for the quest for understanding and knowledge that drives a passionate scientist. 

 


Peter Brown

Peter Brown

Research Interests: Small bodies in the solar system, including-

  • All aspects of meteors and meteoroids
  • Radar measurements of meteors
  • Physical properties of asteroids (spectra, rotation rates)
  • Meteorites and large bodies interacting with Earth’s atmosphere
  • Infrasonic and seismic detection of bolide airbursts

 Career Totals:

  • Papers in Refereed Journals: 82
  • Abstracts, Presentations to Professional Meetings: 31
  • Full Technical Reports:  13

Academic and Professional Appointments:

  • 2001, Director’s sponsored post-doctoral fellowship, Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • 2000, Assistant Professor, The University of Western Ontario
  • 1999, Ph.D. in Physics, The University of Western Ontario
  • 1994, M.Sc. in Physics The University of Western Ontario
  • 1992, B.Sc. in Honors Physics, The University of Alberta

Selected Awards:

  • 2006, Florence Bucke Science Award – UWO
  • 2003, Provincial Research Excellence Award
  • 2002 Asteroid 12397 named Peterbrown
  • 2001, Ontario Distinguished Researcher Award
  • 2001, Canada Research Chair in Meteor Science (UWO)
  • 2001 Plaskett Medal – CASCA/RASC
  • 2000, Ranked among the top 100 Young Canadians to watch in the 21st Century by Maclean’s

 


René Brunet

René Brunet

René Brunet is a Meteorologist working with Environment Canada’s Biosphere museum where he is the Distance Learning and Videoconference Coordinator. Each week, he talks with students and teachers via videoconference about weather, climate and environment issues.

René was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. He studied at the University of St. Thomas in Houston, Texas where he received a Bachelor’s degree in Meteorology with a minor in Television Communications.

More than 25 years of René’s career was spent in television, before he began to work with Environment Canada in April, 2000. He has served as an on-air weathercaster and specialist for Global Television Québec, CBC-TV, the Weather Network and several other American Networks. He has also written, hosted, and co-produced a series of reports about Climate Change. He also once served as mentor, science advisor and trainer for Al Gore’s three day training seminar in Montreal in April 2008.

 


Jinwen Chen

Jinwen Chen

Dr. Jinwen Chen is a senior research scientist and group leader at CanmetENERGY Devon lab, Natural Resources Canada. His research areas and expertise include: oil sands bitumen and heavy oil development, production and processing; petroleum refining; process modeling, simulation and optimization; design, modeling and simulation (including CFD) of multiphase chemical reactors; novel catalyst and catalytic process development; chemical reaction engineering and reactions kinetics; thermodynamics and vapor-liquid phase equilibrium. Before joining CanmetENERGY in 1999, Dr. Chen worked University of Calgary and Washington University in St. Louis as a research scientist, and in Tianjin University as an associate professor. In the past 25 years, Dr. Chen has accomplished numerous research projects sponsored by governments and industrial companies to advance fundamental research and new technology development. He has authored/co-authored over 150 journal and conference proceeding papers, and many industrial client reports. Dr. Chen is a regular reviewer for many scientific journals, a member of AIChE, and a registered professional engineer in Alberta, Canada. He has been a member of many scientific committees and expert panels to organize international conferences, symposia and workshops. He received his BS, MS and Ph. D. degrees in Chemical Engineering from Tianjin University in 1984, 1987, and 1990, respectively.

 


Eric Chisholm

Eric Chisholm

After completing his first degree in mathematics, Eric discovered he was more interested in 'how things work' and ultimately pursued studies in engineering physics. Over the course of his studies it became quite apparent that he preferred chatting with and teaching people and as such embarked on a career path which would allow him to popularize science amongst the masses. Being manager of outreach at the NRC-Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics leaves him in a unique position to field any of your questions, in that, even if stumped he should certainly know who to turn to for the answer! When not engrossed in his work, he can usually be found exploring the 'wilds' of Vancouver Island or grooving out to 40s-50s jazz in a well locked room.

 


Steven Cooke

Steven Cooke

Canada Research Chair and Associate Professor, Department of Biology and Institute of Environmental Science, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

Dr. Steven Cooke and his team conduct interdisciplinary research related to the conservation and science-based management of aquatic resources.  Freshwater and marine fishes are used as research models for experiments conducted in laboratory tanks, experimental ponds, and most commonly, field sites. Specific interests relate to determining the energetic, fitness, and potential evolutionary consequences of a variety of natural (e.g., winter, reproduction) and anthropogenic (e.g., angling, environmental pollution) stressors.  Beyond identifying problems, the lab adopts a solutions-based approach by the development and refinement of strategies to address conservation problems. Cooke has particular expertise in the study of free-swimming fish in the wild using biotelemetry and biologging tools.  He has applied these approaches to a variety of issues including identifying optimal flows associated with hydropower operations, understanding the effects of climate change on migratory fish, and the development of by-catch reduction tools for threatened fish and turtles.  

Cooke is also well known for his work on catch-and-release science and global recreational fisheries.  Cooke has published over 275 peer reviewed papers on topics ranging from conservation social science and stakeholder engagement to behavioural endocrinology and comparative biochemistry.  In 2008 he was awarded the Medal from the Fisheries Society of the British Isles in recognition of his contributions to global fisheries issues at an early stage in his career.  Cooke is currently the President of the Canadian Aquatic Resources Section of the American Fisheries Society and is an editor for the journal “Fisheries” and “Endangered Species Research” and the editor in chief for a new journal called “Conservation Physiology”. 

 


Fiona Cornel

Fiona Cornel is an Evaluator/Biologist with the Biologics and Genetics Therapies Directorate (BGTD) of Health Canada. She performs pre-market reviews of the chemistry and manufacturing information for biologic drugs such as cytokines, hormones, enzymes, and monoclonal antibodies. These reviews form part of the decision-making process for whether a drug will be approved for sale on the Canadian market.  Fiona is also a member of the BGTD Plant Molecular Farming Working Group, which recently released a new Health Canada Guidance Document: Plant Molecular Farming Applications: Plant-Derived Biologic Drugs for Human Use.

Fiona has BSc and MSc degrees in Biology from Queen’s University.  Her background includes more than 15 years working in Health Canada research labs. During that time, she worked on several projects, including developing a model plant system for producing vaccines, and developing a new safety test for vaccines.

 


Chris Derksen

Chris Derksen

Dr. Chris Derksen is a Research Scientist with Environment Canada’s Climate Research Division. Much of Dr. Derksen’s time at work is spent taking measurements for comparison with satellite data in prime bear territory across the Canadian sub-Arctic. It is in the north where he studies the cryosphere (the frozen part of the Earth's surface, including the polar ice caps, continental ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice, and permafrost) and its role in the climate system.

As an undergraduate university student at the University of Waterloo, Dr. Derksen was in the co-operative geography program. During this time, his passion for working on Arctic and sub-Arctic research was born when he had the opportunity to work in the Northwest Territories. Dr. Derksen then studied at the University of Waterloo where he acquired a Ph.D. in Geography.  

Currently, Dr. Derksen is a past President of the Eastern Snow Conference, and an Associate Editor of the Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing.

 


Marcus Dos Santos

Marcus Dos Santos

Marcus Dos Santos is currently an associate professor, undergraduate program director of the department of computer science, Ryerson University, Canada, where he supervises research students both at the undergraduate and graduate level.

Marcus was born and raised in Minas Gerais, Brazil. He studied at the Federal University of Uberlândia, where he received  Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees on computer engineering, and at the University of São Paulo, where received a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering. His research interests reside in advancing the understanding and application of evolutionary computing systems. In 2007, he was visiting professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea

 


Ian Droppo

Ian Droppo

Dr. Ian G. Droppo is a Senior Research Scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Water Science and Technology Directorate in Burlington, Ontario. His main area of focus is to ensure that our lakes and rivers are conserved and protected. With 28 years of experience in multiple government priority areas, his current research is within both the oil sands and Great Lakes region where he investigates sediment and contaminant interactions and their impact on ecosystem health

Dr. Droppo has a B.A. Hons., M.Sc. from McMaster University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Exeter, UK. He holds 4 Adjunct Professorships at Canadian universities (McMaster University, University of Toronto, Ryerson University and the University of Windsor), and has published mare than 140 international peer reviewed publications. He has served on the board of international science organizations, is the Subject Editor for the Journal of Soils and Sediments (Physical and Biochemical Processes) and was inducted into the McMaster University Alumni Gallery in 2008.

More detailed information on Dr. Droppo’s research can be found here.

 


 

Christoph Frei

Christoph Frei

Chris is an associate professor in the Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences at the University of Alberta. He grew up in Switzerland and studied mathematics at ETH Zurich. During his subsequent PhD studies in mathematical finance at ETH Zurich, he simultaneously worked in the financial industry. After receiving his PhD degree, Chris was a researcher at Ecole Polytechnique in Paris and decided to continue in academia because he is intrigued by mathematics and statistics, regarding both their theoretical beauty and usefulness in applications. This combination of theory an d application is also reflected in his current research, which tackles problems from finance and economics using and developing tools from probability theory and stochastic analysis.

 


 

Chadron Friesen

Chadron Friesen

Chad Friesen is currently an associate professor of chemistry at Trinity Western University in British Columbia, Canada, with an adjunct appointment at Simon Fraser University where he co-supervises research students both at the undergraduate and graduate level. In addition to Friesen’s academic work, he has spent time as a visiting scientist at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc. (i.e. DuPont). Terms at DuPont ranged from several months in 2001, to a one year sabbatical term in 2006-2007. Friesen’s research interests reside in industrial applications of fluorine chemistry. Many of Friesen’s journals and patents focus on the design of fluorinated ether stability, functionality, and expanded applications. Current effort in Friesen’s laboratory is on the development of fluorinated ether functionality in applications of fluorous biphase systems (FBS). Chad Friesen completed a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.S.E in Secondary Education from John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Arkansas in 1995. In 1996, he began graduate school at The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, AL, under the direction of Joseph S. Thrasher. Additionally, Jon L. Howell at DuPont co-supervised Friesen in the latter part of his Ph.D. degree while Friesen was employed by DuPont. Chad Friesen completed his Ph.D. in 2000. Chad Friesen began his independent career with Trinity Western University in 2000.

 


Michael Gaultois

Michael Gaultois

Michael Gaultois is a chemist and spectroscopist at the University of Cambridge, England. He is currently developing better materials for electrochemical batteries, and is also actively investigating new ceramics that absorb CO2 from the exhaust of power plants, among other things. People have traditionally investigated these systems by intuition, trial, and error. However, Michael is using data-mining and other big-data techniques to leverage previous knowledge and rapidly screen candidate materials. To learn more, visit Michael's personal website, www.michaelgaultois.com.

 


Jason Gerhard

Jason Gerhard

Dr. Jason Gerhard has over 15 years of experience leading research into soil and groundwater contamination by hazardous industrial pollutants.  After completing his PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Queen’s University, he became an Assistant Professor at University of Edinburgh in 2002.  As an Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair at University of Western Ontario since 2007, he co-leads the RESTORE (Research for Subsurface Transport and Remediation;www.eng.uwo.ca/research/restore/index.htm group

His research program has led to better understanding of the behaviour of contaminants, such as gasoline, jet fuel, chlorinated solvents, creosote, and coal tar, in both soils and fractured rock.  In addition, he leads studies on remediation technologies for cleaning up contaminated industrial sites, including bioremediation, surfactant flooding, chemical oxidation, and others.  He is co-inventor and research leader for a new thermal technology – called STAR - for the remediation of the most contaminated and challenging soils (www.siremlab.co m/star

Dr. Gerhard has particular expertise in developing computer models for simulating the movement of chemicals in the ground and the performance of remediation approaches – these are particularly helpful for improving remediation system effectiveness without conducting hazardous experiments or using ‘trial and error’ at field sites.  Jason is available to answer questions related to groundwater movement and resources, pollutants in soil and groundwater, clean-up of soil and groundwater, and other aspects of the geo-environment.

Sylvain Hallé

Sylvain Hallé

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Sciences and Mathematics at the Université du Québec à Chicoutimi and Director of the Formal Computer Laboratory at UQAC. I received my PhD in computer science from the Université du Québec à Montréal, where I won the Governor General’s Medal for my thesis. I then held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

My research is focused on the application of mathematical methods for the testing and development of computer systems. In practical terms, I develop mathematics-based tools that programmers use to chase down “bugs.” As a professor at UQAC, I have also had the opportunity to teach in a host of other fields, such as Web programming, databases and computer security. The automated testing techniques developed as part of my research have been incorporated in a free Web software that has attracted almost 10,000 visitors since it was launched.

While I was a student, I also participated in the Science and Mathematics in Action project (SMAC), in which I was responsible for the creation of Show Math, a combined lecture and multimedia show that mixes humour and mathematics. Show Math presentations tour Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick, and more than 100 of them have been given since the fall of 2005.

You can find more information about me on my website at:  http://www.leduotang.com/sylvain

I look forward to answering your questions!

 


Bill Howell

Bill Howell

Bill Howell is currently R&D Program Manager for Recycling Technologies at Natural Resources Canada’s Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories in Ottawa.  Most of his responsibilities over the last 20 years with NRCan have involved administration of R&D consortia and management of R&D Programs, in areas such as underground mining (diesel particulate emissions, automation, hydrogen use, explosives-free extraction), mineral and hydrometallurgical processing, electric and hybrid vehicles, R&D contract setup and administration, and the marketing of R&D services.

Bill’s main “leading edge research interests” are mainly carried out as hobbies at home, most often in association with academic and professional societies, including conference assistance and paper reviews.   The main focus is Artificial Neural Networks (with a strong interest as well in Evolutionary Computation), both as “Computational Intelligence” (as opposed to “Artificial Intelligence”) architectures, and as a means of gaining insight into neuron and brain “function” in the sense of relatively simple mathematical models (as opposed to biology!).  Outside of that, home projects tend to rotate (history, astronomy, earth systems, computing, fundamental physics) with themes such as “anomalies”, and the evolution of belief systems, in relation to consensus science.

Bill’s educational background is a BEng (Calgary) and Master of Applied Science (Ottawa) in chemical engineering, but that was a very long time ago…!

 


Richard Hughson

Richard Hughson

Richard Hughson is a Professor and University Research Chair in the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences at the University of Waterloo. Professor Hughson completed undergraduate and master’s degrees in physiology and a PhD in medical science. He is the author of 195 research papers.  His research is examining the effects of space travel and of aging on the cardiovascular system. He is currently studying cardiovascular health in astronauts before and after they spend up to 6-months on the International Space Station in research funded by the Canadian Space Agency. He is also studying the changes in blood vessels, blood pressure control and factors that might be responsible for the reduction brain blood flow with aging in research funded by the Canadian Institutes for Health Research. His basic research program on muscle blood flow control and metabolism during physical activity has been funded for over 30 years by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

Professor Hughson’s research in the science of human health developed from his own participation in competitive distance running. His interest in astronaut health derives from knowledge that without specific exercise programs, life on the International Space Station would cause great reductions in physical fitness.

 


Alexandra Iliescu

Alexandra Iliescu

Alexandra Iliescu recently completed her PhD in Biochemistry from McGill University. Her research interests and expertise include human and molecular genetics, cell biology and protein trafficking. Her work has focused on Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) which are the second most common cause of birth defects in humans after cardiac anomalies. In particular, she investigated mutations found in a specific gene in the DNA of patients with NTDs and their effect in altering the function and normal mode of action of the protein made by this gene.

In addition to her research interests, Alexandra has been involved in several scientific outreach initiatives such as Let’s Talk Science and the Science and Policy Exchange group. Currently, she is a recipient of the CIHR Science Policy award and is pursuing a fellowship at the Public Health Agency of Canada.

 


Leland Jackson

Leland Jackson

Lee Jackson is a professor in the Faculty of Science (Department of Biological Sciences) at the University of Calgary. His research focusses on relationships between the physical, chemical and biological structure of aquatic ecosystems and how that structure affects rates of processes. His research examines the structuring role of submerged aquatic plants in shallow prairie lakes, the impacts of endocrine disrupting compounds on native fish populations, and, the impacts of invasive and nuisance species on southern Alberta freshwater systems (Didymosphenia geminata (commonly called "rock snot"; flowering rush; Prussian Carp; whirling disease).

Dr. Jackson completed his degrees at Queen's University (BSc), University of British Columbia (MSc) and McGill University (PhD). He held an NSERC post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where his research involved modelling organochlorine flows in Great Lakes food webs.

He currently serves on the editorial board of Aquatic Conservation: Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems, and is the Executive Director of Advancing Canadian Wastewater Assets (ACWA).

 


Randall Jamieson

Randall Jamieson

I am a cognitive psychologist who studies how people perceive, learn, remember, and think. One part of my research program focuses on an experimental examination of cognition.  The other part focuses on building computer models to reproduce and explain those data. My goal is to explain human cognition and inform the design of intuition in models of artificial intelligence.
 
I earned my doctorate from Queen’s University in 2005 and completed an NSERC postdoctoral fellowship at McMaster University after that.  I have been a Professor of Psychology at the University of Manitoba since 2007.

 


Dustin Johnson

Dustin Johnson

Dr. Johnson received a B.Sc.H. in the life sciences from Queen's university (Kingston, ON) and a Ph.D. in the medical sciences (molecular immunology, virology and inflammation) at McMaster University (Hamilton, ON). His research focussed on characterising the role of protein kinases in the lifecycle of the obligate intracellular human pathogen C. pneumoniae. He discovered a novel inhibitor of a C. pneumoniae kinase that also prevented bacterial replication and infection in vitro. Dr. Johnson is currently a Senior Clinical Evaluator at Health Canada working in the field of toxicology assessment of biological drugs and clinical trial safety.


Bryan W. Karney

Bryan W. Karney

Bryan W. Karney graduated from UBC in Bio-Resource Engineering in 1980 and completed his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, also from UBC, in 1984.  He is currently a professor of Civil Engineering and the Associate Dean of Cross-Disciplinary Programs at the University of Toronto.  He is also the principal of HydraTek & Associates Inc, a hydraulic transient analysis specialty firm.  Dr. Karney is the senior hydraulic transient specialist in the company with almost 30 years of direct experience in providing hydraulic and hydraulic transient consulting services on a wide range of fluid pipe systems, including water, wastewater, oil, gas, and jet fuel.  

Bryan has spoken and written widely on subjects related to water resource systems, energy issues, hydrology, climate change, engineering education and ethics.  He was Associate Editor for the ASCE’s Journal of Hydraulic Engineering from 1993 to 2005.  He has written or co-written numerous journal papers and articles, including the book titled “Comprehensive Water Distribution Systems Analysis Handbooks for Engineers and Planners, published by MWH Soft.  Bryan has won a number of teaching awards and recognitions including being a finalist in the TVO’s best lecturer competition and received the American Water Works Association’s (AWWA) award for the Best Engineering and Construction Publication Article for 2008.  Dr. Karney was awarded the Northrop Frye award for excellence in teaching and research in 2009.  He is most interested in the areas where public policy, technology, mathematics and physics intersect.

 


Azad K. Kaushik

Azad K. Kaushik

Associate Professor of Immunology, University of Guelph

I was intrigued by the mechanisms of immunity, especially generation of diversity (GOD), that protect and are tolerant to self at the same time. The loss of tolerance, however, leads to development of autoimmune disease occasionally. While in France, United States and Switzerland, our research on construction and regulation of immune system in health and disease demonstrated that same genetic elements of the immune system, earlier identified by us, that defended host against harmful substances or agents also generated pathogenic autoantibodies responsible for many autoimmune diseases.

Our laboratory also demonstrated that B-cell selection during development influences generation of pathogenic autoantibodies. Studies of the construction of immune system across species led us to examine the bovine immune system that has limited germline diversity, but this species employs alternate strategies, for example, exceptionally long CDR3H, for antibody diversification. Our research focuses on basic and functional aspects of antibody engineering, e.g., construction of single chain Fv (scFv) relevant to immunodiagnosis and therapy. Other studies involve autoimmunity and clinical veterinary immunology.

For more information, please visit: http://www.uoguelph.ca/~akaushik/Kaushik_Laboratory/Home.html

 


Anders Knudby

Anders Knudby

Anders Knudby is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography with Simon Fraser University.  His interests include a broad mix of basic and applied remote sensing, spatial ecology and predictive modeling. Recent and ongoing work includes:

Automated processing of coarse-scale remote sensing data for the production of global environmental data sets. Due to the very large volume of remote sensing data produced today, highly automated processing is essential in order to turn all this valuable information into knowledge. His recent work for the Canadian government in this area has focused on automated detection of clouds in AATSR and MERIS data. These two sensors are precursors for instruments on ESA’s Sentinel-3 satellites, to be launched in 2013.

Spatial predictive modeling works by combining two things: 1) maps of environmental variables, and 2) statistical models that quantitatively relate those variables to a subject of interest. The result of that combination is a map of that subject of interest, which often cannot otherwise be mapped. Examples of his recent and ongoing work includes mapping the species richness and biomass of coral reef fishes, as well as indicators of coral reef resilience, for the Fiji Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society, and mapping the locations of deep-sea sponges and corals in collaboration with the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

 


Bryan Koivisto

Bryan Koivisto

Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University 

Bryan Koivisto grew up in a rural area just east of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. After obtaining his Honours Coop BSc degree from the University of Waterloo, he received a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Victoria. After a two year NSERC PDF at the University of Edinburgh, Bryan returned to Canada, and did a second PDF at the University of Calgary. Now he is an Assistant Professor at Ryerson University.

Bryan has always been fascinated with the way that light interacts with matter, specifically, photovoltaics. Now the Koivisto group at Ryerson University investigates the design and fabrication of next-generation photovoltaics including dye-sensitized solar cells using organic light-harvesting dyes and polymer electrolytes.  

More detailed information on Dr. Koivisto’s research can be found at:

http://www.ryerson.ca/~solar/

 


Paul Labbé

Paul Labbé

Paul Labbé joined the Department of National Defence (DND) in 1978. His research in missile seekers and signal processing from 1978 to 1984 culminated in patenting novel circuits for surface-to-air missile (SAM) improvement.

While at the Communications Research Centre (CRC) in Ottawa from 1984 to 1990, his research resulted in developing the key elements of the Internet for the Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) establishments in Canada. He led a new group of scientists at DRDC Valcartier in command and control (C2) systems architectures from 1990 to 2002 and was the first to publish on “model-based measures” (MBMs), an elaboration of quantifiable metrics for Coalition Operations that are absolutely essential to demonstrate the value of this level of decision support that has far-reaching consequences on investment policy.

In 2002, Paul instigated and organized the venue for the 7th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium (ICCRTS), a first in Canada and from 2002 to 2005, worked at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC as Canada’s First Secretary of Defence to TTCP.

From October 2005 to September 2007, Paul worked at the CF Experimentation Centre Ottawa, providing C4ISR expertise and applying scientific methods to defence experimentation. He has been working at the DRDC Corporate Office in the Office of the Chief Scientist since October 2007. There, he is the Head S&T Capability Management, applying enterprise innovation principles to the framework of the methods and tools to be used under Expedition 09.

Paul’s novel MBMs provided a critical insight and canvas to develop the 2006 The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) Guide for Understanding and Implementing Defense Experimentation (GUIDEx) and Case Study 8. GUIDEx impacts the Canadian Forces (CF) concept development, experimentation and capability development processes essential to improve Canadian mission success.

Paul was elected to the rank of IEEE Senior Member in 1997. He graduated from Laval University in Electrical Engineering, BASc in 1978 and MSc in 1980. He has received several awards in his field and for furthering science organization objectives, such as the best paper award in C4ISR from the US OASD in 1998 and his research papers on MBMs were recognized “for their innovation, scientific approach and clarity. They were truly outstanding”.

 


Jennifer Lapum

Jennifer Lapum

Dr. Jennifer Lapum is an Associate Professor at Ryerson University in the Faculty of Community Services, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing. She completed her Doctorate of Philosophy and Master of Nursing at the University of Toronto and her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Ryerson University. She has a diverse background that is informed by both the sciences and the arts. Her career as a Registered Nurse has span over 15 years with a clinical background in cardiovascular and intensive care nursing caring for patients who are acutely ill.

In addition to her work as a professor, she is also a researcher who focuses on issues surrounding death and dying, trauma, and mental health. She works with many populations including those with cardiovascular illnesses, congenital heart disease, Parkinson disease, and individuals who have experienced trauma and violence. In her work, she focuses on how health and community practitioners and systems of care can be enhanced so that they are holistically-oriented and address a person’s physical, psychological, and emotional state. Part of her research is focused on educational and technology-enabled innovations such as virtual gaming simulation for students in post-secondary health-related programs.

In addition, Dr. Lapum is an artist. She uses various mediums such as poetry and photography to articulate patients’ experiences and disseminate her research. In her most recent CIHR-funded research, she created a 1,739 square foot art installation in which individuals can enter into patients’ journeys of heart surgery. See:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYcSmsRW21g

She works closely with an interdisciplinary group of health care practitioners, researchers and artists. In addition, undergraduate and graduate students are provided opportunities to work on her research and learn how to blend the sciences and the arts to advance health care. Her work has been published in journals such as Social Science & Medicine, Heart & Lung, Qualitative Inquiry, Canadian Medical Association Journal and the Forum: Qualitative Social Research.


Glen Loppnow

Glen Loppnow

Glen R. Loppnow is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Associate Dean, Undergraduate in the Faculty of Science at the University of Alberta.

During his career, Dr. Loppnow has focused on the very fast (10-15 - 10-12 seconds!) structure changes that molecules undergo when they are excited by light and the resulting photochemical reactions that occur.  He specializes in biomolecular systems, particularly nucleic acids and uses lasers to "see" those changes.  One key area of research currently is developing ways to examine the damage that occurs in all the DNA of a cell simultaneously when it is exposed to various radiation and chemical environments. 

Since 1988, he has published many scientific articles and maintained funding for his research group.  In 2009, he was named one of Canada's 3M National Teaching Fellows, the highest teaching honor in Canada.

 


Ilana MacDonald

Ilana MacDonald

Dr. Ilana MacDonald is a recent graduate of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Toronto, having received her doctorate in November 2013. For her doctoral thesis with her supervisor Prof. Harald Pfeiffer of CITA, she studied the gravitational waves, that is, ripples in space-time, given off by binary black holes. In particular, she worked towards determining whether or not models of these gravitational waves are good enough for gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). She did her undergraduate degree in Physics at Bishop's University in Lennoxville, QC. She currently tutors in Math and Science, and acts as an Astronomy Consultant. She is also very involved in Astronomy public outreach at UofT, often giving planetarium shows to the public and participating in outreach events. In her spare time, she enjoys knitting, running, and riding her e-bike around the city.

 


Eilean McKenzie

Eilean McKenzie

Eilean McKenzie is a Technical Officer for NRC’ Institute for Biodiagnostics in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She is part of the MR Technology Group at the NRC-Institute for Biodiagnostics (NRC-IBD). She primarily conducts data analysis of MRI experiments and is involved in a number of different research projects, from finding better ways to detect cancer to being part of a cross-Canada team of researchers and clinicians that are developing a virtual reality surgical simulator to improve the training of neurosurgeons.

Eilean has a degree in chemistry and zoology and has been working with NRC since 1999.

 


Julia Mills

Julia Mills

Dr. Julia Mills is the Director of Trinity Western University’s Biotechnology program.  She also holds a tenure-track appointment in the Department of Biology, an external Associate Professor position at the University of British Columbia, and an Adjunct Professor appointment at Simon Fraser University.  She received her B.Sc. (Hons.) in Biology and M.Sc. in Pharmacology and Toxicology from Queen’s University.  She received a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of British Columbia.  Dr. Mills has had over five years in post-doctoral training at the University of Toronto and the BC Cancer Research Centre under the supervision of Drs. Peter St. George-Hyslop and Howard Mount and Dr. Shoukat Dedhar, respectively.  Dr. Mills has collaborated with or consulted for scientists at Active Pass Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Kinetek Pharmaceuticals Inc., Schering-Plough Pharmaceuticals, and Phi Screen Inc.  She has been successful in maintaining peer-reviewed grant funding to support her academic research and has authored many scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals.  Her current research interests include neurogenesis, stem cell biology, and stem cell signalling and their implications in Alzheimer’s Disease, Cancer, and Diabetic Retinopathy. 

 


Sannu Mölder

Sannu Mölder

Sannu Mölder was born in Tallinn, Estonia, in 1935.  He fled to Sweden, with his parents, when the Russians invaded in 1944 and subsequently emigrated to Canada in 1949. He attended high-school and university in Montreal and Toronto.  He flew jets in the RCAF for a few years and then became a professor at McGill University and Chairman of the Mechanical Engineering Department there. Then moved to Toronto’s Ryerson Polytechnic University where he became the Chairman of the Industrial, Mechanical and Aerospace Departments. He was director of the Hypersonics Research Laboratory at McGill (1964 to 1972); Project Director of the Gun-Launched Scramjet Program; participated as consultant to JHU/APL in the NASP configuration definition (1983-84); directed joint Ryerson-U of Toronto program on Studies of Scramjet Inlets. He has taught and lectured at universities in Australia, Japan, USA and Europe.  He is a consultant to NASA and the USAF, an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a Fellow of the Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute. 

Dr. Mölder has a B.A.Sc. in Aeronautical Engineering, an M.A.Sc. in Aerophysics an M.Eng. in Industrial Engineering, all from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from McGill. He was a keynote speaker at the International Hypersonics Conference in 2012. He has authored some 60+ papers on shock waves and hypersonic airbreathing propulsion.  He is a professor emeritus of Aerospace Engineering at Ryerson University and is currently involved in a program for solving problems related to the starting of scramjet air inlets and the behaviour of curved shock waves at McGill University.  He is a certified scuba diver and holds a private pilot’s licence.

 


Silke Nebel

Silke Nebel

Dr. Silke Nebel’s research focuses on the ecology and evolution of avian migration, particularly those of shorebirds. Silke grew up in Germany and moved to the Netherlands for her MSc, and then to Canada to pursue her PhD at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. She then worked as a Research Associate at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia before accepting a position at Western University in London, Ontario.

Over the past 15 years, she has studied habitat and diet choice of migrating shorebirds in Europe and the Americas, population declines in shorebirds in Australia and in aerial insectivores in North America, and most recently, she has worked on the trade-off between immune function and flight performance during migration. To do this, she trained birds to fly in the wind tunnel at the Advanced Facility for Avian Research at Western University. Silke is on the editorial board of the International Wader Study Group Bulletin. After working as a research facilitator at Western University, she has started her own consulting business, specializing in science communication.

 


Theodore Norvell

Theodore Norvell

Theodore Norvell has been interested in machines that compute since playing tic-tac-toe against a relay-based machine when he was 11. He studied computer science at Dalhousie University and the University of Toronto --obtaining a PhD in 1993 under the supervision of Eric Hehner-- and studied as a postdoctoral fellow at Oxford and McMaster Universities.  Between Masters and PhD, he worked in the private sector.

Since 1995, he has been a professor of computer engineering at Memorial University, St. John's. Theodore's research activities relate to the languages people use to program computers and to how we can ensure that programs contain no errors.

His research projects include

  • finding ways to make computer-controlled systems safer using logic,
  • developing methods to translate programs to computer hardware,
  • designing programming languages for safer parallel (concurrent) programming, and
  • using computer graphics and animation to improve the teaching of computing concepts.

When not involved in computer science and engineering, he can often be found teaching fencing to young people in St. John's.

 


Gordon Osinski

Gordon Osinski

Dr. Gordon “Oz” Osinski is currently an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Earth Sciences and Physics and Astronomy at the University of Western Ontario, Canada. He was born and raised in the United Kingdom and graduated from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, with a B.Sc. Honours degree in geology in 1999. Oz completed his PhD in geology in 2004 from the University of New Brunswick (UNB), Fredericton, and was awarded the Governor General's Gold Medal for Academic Excellence in Graduate Studies. His PhD thesis focused on the geology of the Haughton impact crater and surrounding terrains on Devon Island in the Canadian High Arctic – a unique Mars analogue site. He has spent the past 11 summers in the Arctic and has also been on two expeditions to Antarctica as part of the Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET). His research focuses on understanding planetary surfaces through comparative planetology and the use of terrestrial analogues, in particular impact cratering and cold-climate processes. After moving to the University of Arizona for a brief post-doctoral fellowship, Oz was hired by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) to promote Earth-based analogue sites for Mar s and the Moon. In 2007, he won a CSA Fellowship in Space Science, which brought him to the University of Western Ontario as part of the Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration – of which he is now the Deputy Director. He is also Director of the new Canadian node of the NASA Lunar Science Institute and has been awarded the 2009 Nier Prize of the Meteoritical Society.

 


Jackie Rice

Jackie Rice

Dr. Rice holds a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Victoria and is currently a Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Lethbridge as well as Associate Dean of Recruitment and Retention. Dr. Rice also holds an adjunct appointment at the University of New Brunswick and has worked as a programmer analyst in the private sector and as a Visiting Researcher at both Lancaster University in the UK and the University of Victoria in BC. Most of her work is in the area of hardware design, specifically in developing ways to translate mathematical descriptions of functions into circuits, a process known as logic synthesis. She has also published papers on topics such as multiple-valued logic, reversible logic, testing and fault tolerance, FPGAs and representations of functions. At the moment Dr. Rice is starting new work that investigates how sociological factors such as gender, nationality, and experience affect how people write computer programs.

In addition to her research career Dr. Rice teaches a variety of Computer Science courses at the University of Lethbridge and is heavily involved in outreach activities. She is a co-founder of the LUMACS (Life, U, Mathematics and Computer Science) program at the University of Lethbridge and enjoys showing kids how to program Lego robots, write Scratch programs, and learn languages such as Python and Logo. Dr. Rice has two dogs and a cat, loves science fiction, and enjoys textile crafts (knitting, crocheting, sewing, knotting) and gardening in her few moments of spare time.

 


Jake Rice

Jake Rice

Field(s) of Research:

  • Aquatic Ecosystems Science
  • Aquatic Habitat / Aquatic Environmental Science
  • Biodiversity Science
  • Ecosystem effects of fishing
  • Fish Population Science
  • Species at Risk

Research Description:

Over the years I have participated in research on marine and terrestrial community structure and function, analytical methods for addressing uncertainty in ecological data, objective methods for selecting indicators and reference points for use in management, size- and species-based approaches to modelling community and ecosystem dynamics, species – habitat relationships, and population–based vs place-based approaches to management. Recently work has focused on practical aspects of implementing an ecosystem approach to management, methods for integrated ecosystem assessments, and particularly the interfaces between science and policy and between natural and social sciences.

 


Barry Sanders

Barry Sanders

Dr Barry Sanders is iCORE Chair of Quantum Information Science and Director of the Institute for Quantum Information Science at the University of Calgary. He has a BSc degree from the University of Calgary and a PhD from Imperial College London. Before joining the University of Calgary in 2003 he was a Professor at Macquarie University Sydney for twelve years. Dr Sanders has a passion for theoretical physics, especially those problems t hat are amenable to experimental testing. He is especially well known for seminal contributions to theories of quantum-limited measurement, highly nonclassical light, practical quantum cryptography and optical implementations of quantum information tasks. His current research interests include quantum resources & algorithms, optical & atomic implementations of quantum information tasks and protocols, quantum processes in biological systems, and machine learning for quantum control.

 


Kevin Shortt

Kevin Shortt

Kevin has worked in Canada's space industry for over 8 years and has contributed to some of Canada's largest space missions. During his undergraduate studies at York University, he worked as a Research Assistant in the Instrument Services Lab at the Centre for Research in Earth and Space Technology (CRESTech) where he contributed to and maintained lab standards in addition to a variety of other spacecraft instrumentation research tasks. In 1999, he took a position as a Mission Planner for the RADARSAT-1 program at the Canadian Space Agency where he was part of the team responsible for the day to day image acquisition operations and calibration activities for the spacecraft. Following his term at the CSA, he worked as a Research Assistant at the Meteorological Services of Canada where he performed a variety of design tasks for a dual-spectrometer instrument that is currently operating on board the

SCISAT-1 spacecraft to detect ozone concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere. From 2004 to 2006, he worked with the design team responsible for the lidar instrument on board NASA's Mars Phoenix Scout mission which operated on the Martian surface for 5 months in 2008.

Currently, he is involved in research on a new generation of laser communications system for use in ground-to-satellite communications while pursuing a masters degree in electrical engineering at the Royal Military College of Canada. He is also serving as President of the Canadian Space Society, Canada's leading non-profit organisation dedicated to space technology development. In this role he works with members of government, academia and industry to further space technology development in Canada and can often be found discussing space issues on CBC and CTV National news.

Kevin was interested in science and technology from very early on in life. It wasn't until he started reading astronomy books in grade 6 that he actually caught the space bug. Ever since that time, he has been passionately pursuing the exploration of space and continues to be overwhelmed by just how exotic the universe really is.

 


Aaron Slepkov

Aaron Slepkov

Dr. Aaron Slepkov is an Associate Professor of Physics and Canada Research Chair in the Physics of Biomaterials at Trent University. His research interests include optics and photonics, biophysics, and science education.

Dr. Slepkov was born in Ontario, raised in Israel, and completed his high-school education in Canada. He obtained an Honors B.Sc in Physics and Chemistry at Brock University, and masters and doctorate degrees in Physics at the University of Alberta. Aaron has held research positions at Cornell University and the National Research Council of Canada. 

Curiosity is a main driving force in Aaron’s life and he spends far more time asking questions than answering them. When he is not working, he enjoys cooking, reading, and playing with his kids.

 


Julia Spaniol

Julia Spaniol

Julia Spaniol is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Ryerson University. A native of Saarland, Germany, she received her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed postdoctoral training at Duke University Medical Center and at the Rotman Research Institute in Toronto. Dr. Spaniol currently directs the Memory and Decision Processes Laboratory at Ryerson, whose members study the role of motivation in higher-order cognition in younger and older adults. Dr. Spaniol and her trainees use a combination of behavioural and neuroimaging methods and have received research funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

 


Sabine Stanley

Sabine Stanley

Sabine Stanley is an Associate Professor with the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto.  Her research involves planetary physics, nonlinear physics, fluid dynamics, geophysics, MHD or scientific computing.  Her current research projects are in planetary magnetic fields and dynamo theory.


Isaac Tamblyn

Isaac Tamblyn

Dr. Isaac Tamblyn is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. He holds a joint appointment with the National Research Council of Canada. Before joining UOIT, Dr. Tamblyn completed postdocs at Berkeley Lab and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He earned his PhD in Physics from Dalhousie University. Dr. Tamblyn's research interests are in renewable energy and nanoscience.

 


Mohamed A. Tawhid

Mohamed A. Tawhid

Mohamed A. Tawhid got his PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Maryland, USA in 2001. From 2000 to2002, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Faculty of Management, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Currently, he is associate professor at Thompson Rivers University, BC Canada.

He has taught numerical analysis, linear algebra, optimization, operations research and operations management. His research interests include nonlinear/stochastic/heuristic optimization, operations research, modeling and simulation, social networks and neural network. He has published in journals such as Computational Optimization and Applications, J. Optimization and Engineering, Journal of Optimization Theory and Applications, European Journal of Operational Research, Journal of Industrial and Management Optimization, Journal Applied Mathematics and Computation, etc.

Professor Tawhid published more than 20 referred papers and 2 special issues in J. Optimization and Engineering (Springer), and J. Advanced Modeling and Optimization. Also, he has served on editorial board several journals.

 


Ann Therriault

Ann Therriault

Dr. Therriault currently holds the position of Expert, Geoscience Information and Knowledge Management within NRCan’s Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation. She might be from Sept-Iles, a small town on the north shore of Quebec, but her proximity to the famous Manicouagan impact structure would avert a good omen for her career. Her work on shock metamorphism effects in rocks from impact structures made her one of five world expert in the field of shock metamorphism during the 1990s and early 2000s. Her love for her science continues to live via her public and school/university talks and guest speaker to cover the subjects of impact cratering and meteorites. In addition, she offers general talks on the history of the Earth, from its creation 4.6 billion years ago to today, and a critique of scientific content in movies.  Finally, Ann also offers a talk on the history and importance of Canada’s geology in the development of the country and our daily lives.


Malaika Ulmi

Malaika Ulmi

Malaika Ulmi is a geologist who works at the Geological Survey of Canada and has a passion for seeing geoscience applied to benefit society. Her love of the outdoors and curiosity about the earth led her to geology. Her field experience is primarily in mapping volcanic formations as part of hazard research in British Columbia. For the last five years she has worked on an international cooperation project with the national geoscience agencies of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. The project worked to improve the quality of life people of the Andes by reducing their vulnerability to earthquakes, landslides and volcanoes. This was done by putting geohazards in a social context and working with communities, land use planners, educators and emergency managers to incorporate geoscience in decision ma king. The project experience fuelled a passion for work in hazards, and Ulmi looks forward to applying lessons learned in the project to the Canadian context. She particularly enjoys working at the GSC and in geology as there is always new and interesting knowledge to be gained.

 


John Verdon

John Verdon

John Verdon has a rich background in theoretical and applied social science research. His academic background includes a Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Psychology, a Master of Arts in Anthropology and doctoral course work in Sociology. He is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Philosophy.

John joined the Federal Public Service in 1988, initially conducting program evaluations with the Public Service Commission (PSC). During his time with the PSC, he was seconded for two years to the Department of National Defence to work with the Directorate of Social and Economic Analysis (DSEA). Although he returned to the PSC after DSEA was disbanded, he was eager to return to Defence and two years later was deployed back to a newly formed unit – the Directorate of Strategic Human Resource Analysis.

The majority of John’s career thus far has been with DND and within the domain of strategic human resource and foresight research. He is now with the Directorate General Military Personnel Research and Analysis (DGMPRA) and was a key participant in a number of strategic projects including Human Resources 2020, the Network Enabled Operations Working Group and Symposium and recently the Chief Military Personnel – Fight of the Future – Human Resources 2028. John has presented his work nationally and internationally in a number of conferences, including DRDC’s Science and Technology Symposium and the IEEE – Digital Ecosystems and Technologies Symposium.

John’s current work is focused on future Human Resources concepts, including social, organizational and human implications of network technologies for knowledge management, human capital and capability development for human resources management and systems. His Ph.D. work is focused on the development of a new theory and philosophy related to managing human capital in the 21st Century. To a lesser extent, John has also explored the emerging impact of cognitive, biological and nano-technologies to enhance human and social performance.

John has actively participated in international seminars ranging from Gender and Narrativity, to the Next Generation Enterprise, Convergence Technology, Foresight Development and Strategic HR Implications for Canada's Future Military.

 


Yolanda Wiersma

Yolanda Weirsma

Dr. Yolanda Wiersma is an Associate Professor in the Biology Department at Memorial University, in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. A native of southern Ontario, she completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Guelph, and a teaching degree at the University of Toronto. This was followed by two years of teaching junior high school in the Northwest Territories and in downtown Toronto. Following this, she went back to school and did her graduate work (MSc and PhD) back at the University of Guelph, with a one-year stint at Duke University as a Fulbright Visiting Fellow.

Yolanda is a Landscape Ecologist. This does not have anything to do with landscaping – so please don’t ask her any questions about what kind of shrubs will look good in your front yard! Landscape ecologists study “landscapes”, which are best defined as “what you can see from an airplane window”, that is to say – landforms, land use and land cover, and the ways these interact. Put differently, as a landscape ecologist she studies ecological process such as species movement, adaptation, and interactions at large spatial extents. Her research interests include parks and protected areas, wildlife, forest management, and the ways in which human activities and development affect natural systems in the boreal forest of Canada. She uses a variety of tools and techniques in her research, including field work, Geographic Information Systems (computerized mapping), and statistical modelling. She also has a strong interest in Citizen Science and in communicating science to the public.

Yolanda has been out on the “Rock” since 2006 with her husband and 2 boys. They love life on the ocean, and are continually amazed at how easy it is to get away from the city and into open, natural spaces, making it a dream location for an ecologist.

 


Brynn Winegard

Brynn Winegard

Dr. Brynn Winegard is a marketing and strategy professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management, at Ryerson University. Dr Winegard's research investigates such topics as knowledge creation, knowledge management, new product development and managerial applications of social cognitive neuroscience ('neuromanagement'). Prior to an academic career, Brynn spent over a decade working with corporations such as Pfizer Inc., Nestle Inc., Bank of Montrea l, ScotiaBank, CIBC, and Johnson & Johnson Inc.

 


Robert Woodrow

Robert Woodrow

Robert Woodrow was awarded his PhD specializing in the model theory of relational structures by Simon Fraser University in 1977. Since joining the faculty at the University of Calgary in 1980 he has continued research in the area, with applications to problems from discrete mathematics, combinatorics and theoretical computer science.   He has been actively involved in mathematics outreach through writing the Olympiad Corner for Crux Mathematicorum with Mathematical Mayhem from 1988 until 2011, and through activities with the Canadian Mathematical Society. 

 


Rad Zdero

Rad Zdero

Dr. Radovan (Rad) Zdero received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering (Queen’s University, Kingston) with a specialization in biomedical engineering. He is Director of the Biomechanics Lab (St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto) and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (Ryerson University, Toronto). His research involves both experimental and computational techniques. His main research activity is measuring (and improving) the durability of human and artificial bones, hip and knee replacements, and implants used to repair fractured bones. Dr. Zdero’s numerous biomedical engineering and clinical research papers can be found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=zdero r[au]

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