Communications, Capacity and Outreach

Yukon Contaminants Committee and AANDC Regional Office Coordination 2013/2014

Project Leader

Ellen Sedlack, Indigenous and Northern Affairs- Yukon Regional Office, Whitehorse, YT

Project Team

Yukon Contaminants Committee including:  Council of Yukon First Nations; Yukon Government; Yukon Conservation Society; Fisheries and Oceans Canada; and other Yukon Partners

Project Duration: 2012-present


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Yukon Regional NCP Office has operated since 1991 and continues to keep Yukon people informed of the Northern Contaminants Program’s initiatives, provide NCP data upon request, Co-Chair the Yukon Contaminants Committee, and attend the National Management meetings.  To continue this work the Regional office needs to be represented at the Managers meeting.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Report not available at this time.


Synopsis (2014-15)

Abstract:

The Yukon Contaminant Committee and AANDC Regional office Yukon have spent 24 years building an NCP database of contaminants analysis results and a tissue archive of samples.  This past year the Regional representative relocated the fish archive samples to the new Environment Canada archive bank in Burlington Ontario. The bird and mammal tissue archive component is in the process of being moved to the tissue archive held by Environment Canada in Ottawa, Ontario. The database is still in the process of being integrated into the Polar Data Catalogue and a data rescue exercise is on-going to collate errant data sets from the time the original database was inoperable.

Regionally, NCP supports long term core monitoring programs for the Porcupine caribou herd, lake trout from Lakes Kusawa and Laberge and the Little Fox Lake air monitoring site for atmospheric mercury and POPs. The Regional office of AANDC facilitates this work through funding arrangements.

Keys messages:

  • NCP Yukon Database being transferred to Polar Data Catalogue
  • Yukon NCP fish tissue archive moved to Environment Canada in Burlington, Ontario
  • Yukon NCP bird and mammal tissue in the process of being moved to Environment Canada in Ottawa, Ontario.
  • AANDC Regional support for NCP funded projects

Synopsis (2013-2014)

Abstract

The Yukon Contaminants Committee and AANDC Yukon Regional office have spent over 20 years building an NCP database of contaminants analysis results and a tissue archive of samples. This past year the regional representative endeavoured to find a permanent home for the tissue archives and worked with the Yukon Research Centre and the NCP Secretariat to integrate the Yukon database into the Polar Data Catalogue online database. Regionally, the program supports contaminants monitoring of the Porcupine caribou herd and lake trout from Lakes Kusawa and Laberge, as well as atmospheric mercury monitoring at the Little Fox Lake site. This site is also part of the passive monitoring program for organic compounds, led by Environment Canada. 

Key Messages

  • NCP Yukon database, covering 20 years of results, is being integrated into the Polar Data Catalogue online database.
  • A permanent repository is being sought for an archive of tissue samples collected over twenty years.
  • AANDC regional support for research complements NCP-funded monitoring projects in the Yukon.

Synopsis (2012-2013):

The Yukon Contaminant Committee and AANDC Regional office Yukon have spent over 20 years building an NCP database of contaminants analysis results and a tissue archive of samples. Regionally, the Program supports long term trend monitoring of the Porcupine caribou herd and Lake Trout from Lakes Kusawa and Laberge. The NCP has also provided funding for the Little Fox Lake site to monitor atmospheric mercury entering the Yukon and Western Arctic since 2007. The Regional office of AANDC facilitates this work through funding arrangements.

Key Messages

  • NCP Yukon Database maintained
  • 20 year NCP tissue archive maintained
  • AANDC Regional support for research that compliments NCP funded projects in the Yukon

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NWT Regional Contaminants Committee (NWT RCC)

Project Leader: Carole Mills, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Yellowknife, NT
Telephone: 867-669-2665

Mardy Semmler, Gwich’in Tribal Council, Inuvik, NT
Tel: 867-777-7913
Email: msemmler@gwichin.nt.ca

Tim Heron, Northwest Territories Métis Nation
Tel: 867-872-2770;
Email: rcc.nwtmn@northwestel.net

Project Team:

Members of the NWT RCC (representatives from Dene Nation, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Inuvialuit Game Council, Gwich’in Tribal Council, Sahtu Dene Council, Deh Cho First Nations, Tlicho Government, Akaitcho Territory Government, North Slave Métis Alliance, Northwest Territory Métis Nation, Aboriginal Affairs Northern Development Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, GNWT Environment & Natural Resources, GNWT Health and Social Services, and the Aurora Research Institute).

Northern Regions Included in the Study: North West Territories

Project Duration: 2013-2015


2014-15

The Northwest Territories Contaminants Committee (NWT RCC) advises on communication of information to residents of the Northwest Territories (NWT) on the presence and possible effects of long range contaminants in air, land, water, fish, wildlife and humans as part of the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP). 

The NWT RCC also reviews NCP proposals and participates in the development of NCP research blueprints relevant to NWT; members discuss community based contaminant concerns which may affect traditional foods and the environment.  The committee consists of representatives from national and regional Aboriginal partners, as well as various departments in the federal and territorial governments.  The network of people making up the committee is an efficient means of having discussions on how to relay information on contaminants, NCP research and their results and research initiatives between NWT communities, relevant organizations, other contaminants programs representatives and the Northern Contaminants Programs staff. The NWT RCC meets for teleconference calls and one annual in-person meeting to review all proposals submitted to the Northern Contaminants Program.  The committee compiles relevant reference materials received from the NCP Results Workshop, researchers and the NWT NCP Secretariat and provides contaminant information to NWT residents and Aboriginal governments, as well as assists residents in addressing their contaminant concerns.

Project Summary (2013-2014)

The Northwest Territories Regional Contaminants Committee (NWT RCC) advises on communication of information to residents of the Northwest Territories (NWT) on the presence and possible effects of long range contaminants in air, land, water, fish, wildlife and humans as part of the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP).

The NWTRCC also reviews NCP proposals and participates in the development of NCP research blueprints relevant to NWT; members discuss community based contaminant concerns which may affect traditional foods and the environment. The committee compiles relevant reference materials received from the NCP Results Workshop, researchers and the NWT NCP Secretariat and provides contaminant information to NWT residents and Aboriginal governments, as well as assists residents in addressing their contaminant concerns.

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Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee: Coordinating and Learning from Contaminants Research in Nunavik

Project Leader:


Elena Labranche, Chairperson, Nunavik Nutrition Health Committee, Public Health Department, Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services, Kuujjuaq
Tel: (819) 964-2222; E-mail: Elena_labranche@ssss.gouv.qc.ca


Project team:


Amélie Bouchard, Marie-Josée Gauthier, Serge Déry, Jean-François Proulx, Sylvie Ricard, and Caroline D’Astous, Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services; Suzanne Bruneau, Institut national de santé publique du Québec; Chris Furgal, Trent University; Ellen Avard and Barrie Ford, Nunavik Research Centre, Kuujuaq; Marie-Ève Guay, Alain Ishac, Tulattavik Health Centre, Kuujuaq; Josée Laporte, Inuulitsivik Health Centre, Puvirnituq; Margaret Gauvin, Julie-Ann Berthe, and Betsy Palliser, Kativik Regional Government (KRG), Kuujjuaq; Eliana Manrique, Kativik School Board (KSB); Eric Loring, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK); hunter representative


Project Duration: ongoing


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee (NNHC) was established in 1989 to deal with issues related to food, contaminants, the environment, and health in Nunavik. The committee acts as the authorized review and advisory body for health and nutrition issues in the region, and includes representation from many of the organizations, agencies, and research bodies concerned with these issues. The committee provides guidance and acts as a liaison for researchers and agencies, directs work on priority issues, communicates with and educates the public on health and environment topics and research projects, and represents Nunavik interests at the national and international levels. In 2016/17, the committee will continue to implement regional and national long-term strategies for communication activities based on regional needs and priorities. The NNHC will also be involved in the definition and implementation of human health monitoring activities related to contaminants. For that purpose, the NNHC will contribute to the definition and selection of indicators pertaining to human health in relation to food and contaminants to be included in the Qanuilirpitaa 2017 regional health survey.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Abstract

The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee was established in 1989 to deal with issues related to food, contaminants, nutrition and health in Nunavik. Since its inception, the committee has broadened its perspective to take a more holistic approach to environment and health issues inclusive of both benefits and risks. Today, the committee acts as the authorized review and advisory body for health and nutrition issues in the region and includes representation from many of the organizations and agencies concerned with these issues, as well as those conducting research on them. The committee provides guidance and acts as a liaison for researchers and agencies, from both inside and outside the region, directs work on priority issues, communicates with and educates the public on health and environment topics and research projects, and represents Nunavik interests at the national and international levels. All activities are conducted with the goal of protecting and promoting public health in Nunavik, through more informed personal decision making.

Key messages

  • The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee is the key regional committee for health and environment issues in Nunavik;
  • The committee advises the Nunavik Public Health Director about educating the public on food and health issues, including benefits and risks associated with contaminants and country foods;
  • The committee continues to be active within the NCP, reviewing and supporting research in the region, ensuring liaison with researchers and helping in the communication of research results in a way that is appropriate and meaningful to Nunavimmiut

Synopsis (2014-15)

Abstract

The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee (originally named the PCB Resource Committee) was established in 1989 to deal with issues related to food, contaminants, the environment and health in Nunavik. Since its inception, the committee has broadened its perspective to take a more holistic approach to environment and health issues inclusive of both benefits and risks. Today, the committee acts as the authorized review and advisory body for health and nutrition issues in the region and includes representation from many of the organizations and agencies concerned with these issues, as well as those conducting research on them. The committee provides guidance and acts as a liaison for researchers and agencies, from both inside and outside the region, directs work on priority issues, communicates with and educates the public on health and environment topics and research projects, and represents Nunavik interests at the national and international levels. All activities are conducted with the goal of protecting and promoting public health in Nunavik, through more informed personal decision making.

Key messages

  • The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee is the key regional committee for health and environment issues in Nunavik;
  • The committee advises the Nunavik Public Health Director about educating the public on food and health issues, including benefits and risks associated with contaminants and country foods;
  • The committee continues to be active within the NCP, reviewing and supporting research in the region, ensuring liaison with researchers and helping in the communication of research results in a way that is appropriate and meaningful to Nunavimmiut.

Synopsis (2013-2014)

Abstract

The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee (originally named the PCB Resource Committee) was established in 1989 to deal with issues related to food, contaminants, the environment and health in Nunavik. Since its inception, the committee has broadened its perspective to take a more holistic approach to environment and health issues inclusive of both benefits and risks. Today, the committee acts as the authorized review and advisory body for health and nutrition issues in the region and includes representation from many of the organizations and agencies concerned with these issues, as well as those conducting research on them. The committee provides guidance and acts as a liaison for researchers and agencies, from both inside and outside the region, directs work on priority issues, communicates with and educates the public on health and environment topics and research projects, and represents Nunavik interests at the national and international levels. All activities are conducted with the goal of protecting and promoting public health in Nunavik, through more informed personal decision making.

Key Messages

  • The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee is the key regional committee for health and environment issues in Nunavik.
  • The committee advises the Nunavik Public Health Director about educating the public on food and health issues, including benefits and risks associated with contaminants and country foods.
  • The committee continues to be active within the NCP, reviewing and supporting research in the region, ensuring liaison with researchers and helping in the communication of research results in a way that is appropriate and meaningful to Nunavimmiut.

Synopsis (2012-2013):

Abstract

The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee (originally named the PCB Resource Committee) was established in 1989 to deal with issues related to food, contaminants, the environment and health in Nunavik. Since its inception, the committee has broadened its perspective to take a more holistic approach to environment and health issues inclusive of both benefits and risks. Today, the committee acts as the authorized review and advisory body for health and nutrition issues in the region and includes representation from many of the organizations and agencies concerned with these issues, as well as those conducting research on them. The committee provides guidance and acts as a liaison for researchers and agencies, from both inside and outside the region, directs work on priority issues, communicates with and educates the public on health and environment topics and research projects, and represents Nunavik interests at the national and international levels. All activities are conducted with the goal of protecting and promoting public health in Nunavik, through more informed personal decision making.

Key Messages

  • The Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee is the key regional committee for health and environment issues in Nunavik;
  • The committee advises the Nunavik Public Health Director about educating the public on food and health issues, including benefits and risks associated with contaminants and country foods;
  • The committee continues to be active within the NCP, reviewing and supporting research in the region, ensuring liaison with researchers and helping in the communication of research results in a way that is appropriate and meaningful to Nunavimmiut.

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Continuing to meet the Contaminants and Health Information Needs of Nunatsiavummiut

Project Leader: Katie E. Winters, Nunatsiavut Government (NG), Nain, NL
Email: katie_winters@nunatsiavut.com Tel: 709-922-2380

Project Team:

  • Tom Sheldon, Rodd Laing, Carla Pamak, Dorothy Angnatok, Michele Wood, Ed Tuttauk, Jamie Brake, Nunatsiavut Government;
  • Eric Loring, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

Northern Regions Included in the Study: Nunatsiavut

Project Duration: 2011-2014


Project Summary (2013-2014)

For many years, a Northern Contaminants Researcher has been a core component of the Nunatsiavut Government. Although the Northern Contaminants Researcher is housed at the Nain Research Centre within the Environment Division of the Department of Lands and Natural Resources, she works inter-departmentally and across communities through the Nunatsiavut Health and Environment Review Committee (NHERC) and other means for the benefit of Labrador Inuit. This project ensures the continuation of both the Northern Contaminants Researcher position as well as the NHERC. It is designed to complement other NCP subprograms ongoing or previously implemented in the region (ringed seal and arctic char sampling and ringed seal TK collection are coordinated through the Northern Contaminants Researcher at the Nain Research Centre on an annual basis). Most importantly, however, this project ensures there is a trusted point of contact who will actively engage Nunatsiavimmiut while disseminating contaminants related information within the context of the many other related issues and initiatives in the region.

Synopsis (2012-2013):

During 2012-2013, the Northern Contaminants Researcher (NCR) continued to communicate and educate Nunatsiavummiut about contaminants information, research activities, the benefits of wild foods and any health related issues that affect them on a daily basis. This communication took place using written documents, social media, posters, various media tools and through community feasts. Funding from the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) also allowed the Nunatsiavut Health and Environment Research Committee (NHERC) to travel to five Nunatsiavut communities to inform residents about contaminate related issues, including ongoing and upcoming NCP research projects. These meetings also allowed the NHERC to understand the needs and concerns of individual communities within Nunatsiavut. Contaminant results from the Inuit Health Survey (2008) were presented and discussed with Nunatsiavut communities through the NCR and the Director of Environment for the Nunatsiavut Government, Tom Sheldon. The NCR, through the Nain Research Center, also provided information about the benefits of traditional food while hosting community feasts that promoted country food, including seal, char, caribou, ducks and partridges to the residents of Nain. Furthermore, the NCR assisted many visiting researchers with work that is new or ongoing in the Nunatsiavut region, connecting researchers with residents

Key Messages

  • The Northern Contaminants Researcher communicated information about benefits of country food and encouraged Nunatsiavummiut to continue to consume country food, as the benefits outweigh any risk associated with the current contaminant load that the country food may contain. Results from the Inuit Health Survey were used as a tool to emphasize these benefits and risks.
  • The NHERC traveled to the five Nunatsiavut communities, presenting to both the community and schools, to inform residents on past, current and upcoming research projects, especially those relating to contaminants. This allowed for questions and feedback from residents on contaminants and research projects of concern within their region. Areas of concern for most communities were contaminants in country food, including char, ringed seal and caribou, as well as the downstream effects of the Muskrat Falls Hydroelectric Development.
  • The NCR continued to work with researchers traveling to Nunatsiavut to ensure they understand the concerns, culture and traditions of the Inuit in Nunatsiavut. Also, the NCR encouraged the researchers to become more involved within the communities, including hiring and training local residents, helping to build capacity within our region.
  • The NCR worked in conjunction with the Inuit Research Advisor and the Research Outreach Coordinator to host community-wide traditional food events, which include a healthy traditional meal (caribou soup, char, seal) in the Nain Research Centre, while browsing through research and contaminant-related information.
  • In partnership with the Research Outreach Coordinator, harvesters and researchers, the NCR collected and processed samples for NCP projects, building capacity and reducing costs for the research projects.


Synopsis (2011-2012):

Abstract
In 2011-2012, the Northern Contaminants Researcher continued to communicate and educate Nunatsiavummiut about contaminants and the benefits of traditional/country foods, so that Labrador Inuit may make informed decisions in their daily lives. This happened through various initiatives, including the Nunatsiavut Health and Environment Research Committee (NHERC), the Avativut Newsletter that is funded under the Northern Contaminants Program and others, and community activities operating out of the Nain Research Centre. NHERC members travelled the Nunatsiavut coastal communities again this past year to communicate about various contaminant-related research and monitoring programs in the region. The Avativut Newsletter was published in January 2012, and included information about ongoing and future research for the Nunatsiavut communities as well as the benefits and risks of contaminants and traditional/country foods. The newly operational Nain community freezer, which is based in the Nain Research Centre, provided many opportunities to discuss the importance of country foods for physical and mental health in the region. The Northern Contaminants Researcher was also an active member on the Nunatsiavut Steering Committee for the Inuit Health Survey, providing both guidance and translation services for the contaminants portion of the IHS, the results of which are expected to be released publicly in summer 2012. Finally, the Northern Contaminants Researcher was instrumental in the implementation of Tukisimakatigennik ('understanding together'), a community-led ringed seal knowledge (Inuit and science) project, that included a workshop bringing together harvesters and scientists in Nain, the outcomes of which have influenced the process through which ringed seal contaminant monitoring programs will be carried out in the region, going forward.

Key Messages

  • The Northern Contaminants Program Researcher for the Nunatsiavut Government continues to communicate contaminants, research and environmental issues, conduct research and promote networking relationships between the communities of Nunatsiavut and outside scientists.
  • Nunatsiavut residents continue to have concerns and interest in contaminants, health and research in their communities. Members of NHERC travelled the Nunatsiavut communities and heard firsthand some of these concerns while also presenting research and contaminant-related programs operating in the region.
  • The Northern Contaminants Researcher was an active member on the Nunatsiavut Steering Committee for the Inuit Health Survey, providing both guidance and translation services for the contaminants portion of the IHS, the results of which are expected to be released and communicated to the public in summer 2012.
  • The Northern Contaminants Researcher worked with the Inuit Research Advisor to run several 'on-the-ground' traditional foods and healthy eating events in the community of Nain, the largest community in Nunatsiavut. These events were highly successful and included research and contaminants-related information displayed throughout the Nain Research Centre for people to read and ask questions about while they enjoyed country foods (eg. Caribou soup, seal, char) that were being served. We hope that these traditional food and healthy eating events will continue to promote the healthiness and richness of wild foods in Nunatsiavut, while placing contaminants-related information in an appropriate context.

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The Nunavik Inuit Research Advisor: Building Health and Environment Research Capacity in Kativik Regional Government (KRG)

Project Leaders:

Michael Barrett, Associate Director, Renewable Resources, Environment, Lands and Parks Department, Kativik Regional Government
Tel: (819) 964-2961 #2271; Email: mbarrett@krg.ca

Project Duration: ongoing


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Nunavik Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) continues to serve as the first step in a more coordinated approach to community involvement with Arctic science in Nunavik. The IRA position is housed within the Renewable Resources Department of the Kativik Regional Government and works closely with the Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee (NNHC), the Nunavik Board of Health and Social Services, and the Makivik Research Center. The objective of the IRA position in Nunavik is to help facilitate research at the program level by assisting researchers from the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) and ArcticNet, as well as preparing communities in advance of research. Together, with IRAs in the other Inuit regions of Canada, the Nunavik IRA works towards achieving a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science and research. In addition to NCP support, the Nunavik IRA position is also funded by ArcticNet.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Abstract

The Nunavik Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) is part of the Renewable Resources, Environment, Lands and Parks Department of the Kativik Regional Government. The IRA works in close cooperation with the Nunavik Board of Health and Social Services (NRBHSS) and the Makivik Research Centre, and is co-funded by the NCP and ArcticNet. The aim of the IRA is to facilitate research at the regional level and assure the effective liaison between northern communities and researchers.

In order to achieve the objectives, the advisor reviews research proposals and provides relevant comments and suggestions. Attending meetings, like the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) Results Workshop, Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee meetings (NNHC), and international scientific conferences such as the ArcticNet Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM), is part of the IRA mandate. The IRA also organizes and gives training sessions in collaboration with the three other regional IRAs, in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut, and Nunatsiavut.

Key messages

  • Research occurring in the North is beneficial and should be done in concert with local communities to better answer their needs, values, priorities and/or concerns
  • In order to achieve that goal, communication between northern and scientific communities must be possible
  • The role of the IRA is to promote this communication and facilitate the establishment of a relationship and collaboration between northerners and the research community
  • The IRA guides and advises research projects or regional authorities in regards of Inuit needs, and communicates back to the communities the project results

Synopsis (2014-15)

Abstract

The Nunavik Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) is part of the Renewable Resources, Environment, Lands and Parks Department of the Kativik Regional Government. The IRA works in close cooperation with the Nunavik Board of Health and Social Services (NRBHSS) and the Makivik Research Centre, and is co-funded by the NCP and ArcticNet.  The aim of the IRA is to facilitate research at the regional level and assure the effective liaison between northern communities and researchers.  

In order to achieve the objectives, the advisor reviews research proposals and provides relevant comments and suggestions. Attending meetings, like the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) Results Workshop, Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee NNHC meetings, and international scientific conferences such as the ArcticNet Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM), is part of the IRA mandate. The IRA also organizes and gives training sessions in collaboration with the three other regional IRAs, in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut, and Nunatsiavut).

Key messages

  • Research occurring in the North is beneficial; however, it should be done in concert with local communities to better answer their needs, values, priorities and/or concerns.
  • In order to achieve that goal, communication between northern and scientific communities must be possible.
  • The role of the IRA is to promote this communication and facilitate the establishment of a relationship and collaboration between northerners and the research community.
  • The IRA guides and advises research projects or regional authorities in regards of Inuit needs, and communicates back to the communities the project results.

Synopsis (2012-2013):

Abstract

The IRA position is housed within the Renewable Resources, Environment, lands and Parks Department of the Kativik Regional Government (KRG) and works closely with the Nunavik Board of Health and Social Services NNHC and the Makivik Research Centre. In addition to the Northern Contaminants Program support, the Nunavik IRA position is also co-funded by ArcticNet and the Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments.

The Nunavik Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) continues to serve as the first step in a more coordinated approach to community involvement and coordination of arctic science in Nunavik.

The objectives of the IRA position in Nunavik are to help facilitate research at the program level as well as to act as a liaison between northern communities and researchers to facilitate research and the development of effective partnerships. This includes offering guidance to researchers about the northern concerns and priorities as well as assisting in the development of local research capacity, and preparing communities in advance of research.

The IRA reviews national and international research proposals and provides comments. She attends the meetings of the Northern Contaminants Program, attends international scientific conferences like the IPY or the ArcticNet ASM and works closely with the ITK on research reviews. The Nunavik IRA collaborates with the other regional IRAs in training session, producing and distributing a brochure on the role of the Nunavik Inuit Research Advisors. She also participates in meetings and workshops with the Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee.

Key Messages

  • Shifting the way research is seen and done in the Arctic and in Inuit communities for the benefit of Nunavik.
  • Developing for the IRA to be the first point of contact for all researchers conducting work in Nunavik. Helping researchers and communities to coordinate and communicate information using various strategies that would attract future participation from the region in collaboration with research teams.
  • Providing input and direction to three major Arctic Research Programs (NCP, Nasivvik and ArcticNet), to related research centers and partners (NNHC, Makivik Research Center, Centre d’études nordiques, Centre interuniversitaire d’études et de recherches autochtones, CNRS Institue of Ecology and Environment in Montpellier, HTO, NICCC, NICHO, NICER, KEAC, KSB, NRBHSS, Inuit Knowledge Center, ITK, ICC, Nunavik communities). The IRA sits on the Nunavik Nutrition and Health Committee providing a voice in the NCP proposal process and communication of NCP health information to Nunavik communities.
  • The IRA undertakes a number of diverse tasks for KRG ranging from attending workshops/meetings and focus groups to collaborating and networking with researchers.
  • The IRA also undertakes a number of tasks for both ArcticNet and Nasivvik, helping in liaison and avoid overlap in research activities.

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The Research Advisor: Increasing Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated's Social and Cultural Research Coordination

Project Leaders:

Natan Obed, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc, Iqaluit, NU
Tel: (867)-975-4900; E-mail: nobed@tunngavik.com

Romani Makkik, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Iqaluit, NU
Tel: (867)-975-4926; E-mail: rmakkik@tunngavik.com

Project Team: Sharon Edmunds-Potvin and Andrew Dunford, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc

Northern Regions Included in the Study: Nunavut

Project Duration: 2012-2015


Synopsis (2014-15)

Abstract: In the 2014-2015 fiscal year the Research Advisor concentrated on networking and bringing more awareness about the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) in the region through various means.  First, the ongoing support and work with the Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee (NECC) has proven to be successful again with the participation of researchers providing their communication plans/ materials prior to distribution.  This gives the committee chance to vet and approve the way the research is being shared with Nunavummiut.  Second, the participation of the Research Advisor with NCP projects and assisting in community consultations was a learning experiencing in terms of challenges and benefits of community visits.  The participation of the Research Advisor was also an opportunity her to provide presentations and inform Nunavummiut about NCP face-to-face and answer any questions community members had. 

Key messages:

It is important that the Research Advisor continue to liaise between Nunavummiut and NCP researchers for the benefit of the program.   That NCP continue to support and encourage:

·         Inclusion of community members of NCP projects where projects are happening, or within the vicinity closes to the community where research is being conducted.

·         Researchers ensure they communicate with communities prior to, during and after research is conducted.

·         Researchers look at various ways of contributing towards capacity building and training through their projects, and last but not least,

·         Include and recognize that Inuit have knowledge of the region they live in and ask community members about how to include Inuit knowledge in their projects.


Project Summary (2013-2014)

Participating in research activities associated with the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), ArcticNet, Nasivvik and independent research projects represents a significant scope of work for Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated (NTI).  As such the purpose of this submission is to build NTI’s capacity as it relates to participation in Northern Contaminants Program-related activities.  The research advisor will work in close association with NTI’s research team and Nunavut communities to enhance research relationships as well as implement a Nunavut-specific research agenda that also includes priorities related to the Northern Contaminants Program, Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee (NECC) and the Government of Nunavut Health and Social Services department represented by the Chief Medical Officer of Health. 

The research advisor will continue to provide research assistance to communities (e.g. review and conduct adjudication of proposals submitted to NCP) and provide advice about contaminants, research results and provide policy support for those responsible for risk communication in the territory such as the Government of Nunavut and the Northern Contaminants Program. 


Synopsis (2012-2013):

Each Inuit region has an Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) co-funded by NCP, ArcticNet, the Nasivvik Center for Inuit Health and Changing Environments as well as a host institution. In Nunavut, the Research Advisor is hosted by Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated. Although this synopsis report will highlight NCP related activities, it is important to note that many of the funding organization responsibilities for the research advisor position overlap.

The Research Advisor joined NTI’s research team and the inter-regional Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) team in March 2012. NCP related activities include participating in regular IRA team teleconferences, attending regional contaminants committee (Niqiit Avatittinni Committee) meetings as well as communicating with the NAC and NCP researchers. Additional activities include working on NCP-funded Inuit Health Survey Risk Perception and Messaging Evaluation project, developing “Research in Nunavut” Fact Sheets, assisting in the development of the IRA training handbook, co-facilitating workshops at ArcticNet’s ASM Student Day as well as presenting on an APECS online webinar series regarding working with northern communities.

As part of NTI’s Social and Cultural Development department research team, the research advisor’s activities are wide ranging. NTI’s research team is now at full capacity and is on its way to playing an even greater role in the realm of research occurring in Nunavut.

Key Messages

In 2012-2013, the Research Advisor’s involvement in NCP research included:

  • Established relationships and regular communications with NCP researchers working in Nunavut.
  • Active participant on the Niqiit Avatittinni Committee. This includes promoting Inuit interests in the social-cultural review of NCP proposals.
  • Reviewing NCP blueprints.
  • Regularly reviewing communication materials and providing feedback from a social-cultural perspective. This includes promoting incorporation of traditional knowledge in research projects as well as greater involvement of Inuit at all levels of research, including project development.
  • Advancements in IRA funding arrangements – i.e. NCP funding dollars for Nunavut IRA position to now flow through ITK. 

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NCP Communications, Capacity and Outreach Products for Policy Makers and Inuvialuit Communities in the ISR

Project leader:

Shannon P. O’Hara, Inuit Research Advisor, Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, Inuvik, NT,
Tel: (867) 777-7026; Fax: (867) 777-4023; E-mail: sohara@inuvialuit.com


Project team:

Nellie J. Cournoyea, Chair and CEO, Inuvialuit Regional Corporation; Evelyn Storr, Executive Director, Community Development Division, IRC


Duration: 2013-present


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Inuit Research Advisor in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) will engage Indigenous people, researchers and northerners from Canada as well as international research bodies conducting research in the ISR. The goal of this work is to inform northerners of NCP research and results so that they can make informed dietary choices as it relates to the consumption of traditional/country food. In addition, the IRA attends annual capacity building and training made possible by NCP and ArcticNet funds. To date, IRAs have received training in ethics, effective presentations, sustaining long term business relationships, and most recently how to move research into policy. Furthermore, IRAs are informed of the role NCP plays in the national and international arenas in relation to how NCP results are used by the Government of Canada to inform and implement international global pollution protocols and agreements.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Abstract:

In 2015-2016, the Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) completed all project deliverables of this proposal including, attending two NWT Regional Contaminants Committee meetings held in Yellowknife, NT in October 2015 and February 2016, attending the NCP Annual Results Workshop in Vancouver, BC from December 7-8, 2015, and from February 23-25, 2016 helped coordinate, participated and contributed funding to the NCP funded Beluga Summit that was hosted by researcher, Dr. Lisa Loseto and her team.

Key messages

  • Participated in the planning and execution of a Beluga Summit (Feb. 23-25, 2016, Inuvik)
  • Participated in the social-cultural review of NCP proposals as part of the Northwest Territories Regional Contaminants Committee
  • IRA was elected co-chair of the Northwest Territories Regional Contaminants Committee. Term ends February 2017
  • IRA is engaging with the Joint Secretariat or Inuvialuit Game Council to discuss ways to enhance the review of NCP proposals in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region
  • NCP Results Workshop (Dec 7-8, 2016, Vancouver) was a good opportunity to hear from many northerners about their roles in NCP projects

Synopsis (2014-15)

Abstract

The Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) continues to serve in the IRA capacity within Inuvialuit Regional Corporation (IRC) while also conducting projects under the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) and other organizations that fund Inuit specific programming. These projects ensure that residents and frontline workers in the ISR are informed about research led by NCP, ArcticNet and other research led by various other organizations, governments and industry. This year, the IRA successfully completed two NCP projects, including one edition of the Inuvialuit Research Newsletter and the one Regional Community Tour where the IRA hosted six separate meetings in the communities of Aklavik, Inuvik, Paulatuk, Sachs Harbour, Tuktoyaktuk and Ulukhaktok. These meeting were held in conjunction with a two day proposal writing workshop funded by Health Canada, which total a three day visit in each community for training and program updates.

The IRA for the ISR also served as the Chair of the NWT Regional Contaminants Committee (NWT RCC) from February to October 2014 and was nominated again in February 2015 to serve as co-chair until 2016. Therefore, the IRA was extra busy this year with Chairing responsibilities during the call for proposals and during the consultation process, following up with each researcher conducting research in the ISR. The IRA also continues to work regularly with the other three IRA’s from Nunavut, Nunavik and Nunatsiavut. We connect around one to two times a month via teleconference to discuss projects, upcoming events and annual training. Our group completed our annual training in 2014 completing a course offered at Algonquin College in Ottawa, ON called “Building and Sustaining Effective Business Relationships”. From this, each IRA learned valuable lessons that apply to our positions such as how to work effectively in multi-disciplinary environments.

In addition to NCP work, the IRA also managed to secure additional funding and conducted two capacity building and training projects on behalf of IRC including a proposal writing workshop for Health Canada Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program (CCHAP) for First Nations and Inuit Communities and a Reindeer Harvesting Program funded by the NWT Anti-Poverty Fund.

Key messages:

  • The Inuit Research Advisor continues to monitor research in the ISR via the review of ARI research license applications. Results are then published in the Inuvialuit Research Newsletter.
  • The IRA is becoming more involved with NCP Management Committee and attended the NCP Management Committee April 2014 meeting in Ottawa as the Chair of the NWT RCC.
  • The IRA attended a joint NCP Management Committee/NWT RCC meeting held in Yellowknife, NT in October 2014.
  • The IRA assisted all ISR based researchers this year in the role of Chair of the NWT RCC ensuring NCP had their consultation forms and letters of support. IRA also assisted researchers via review of proposals and logistical and communication plans.
  • The IRA also served as a liaison for partners such as ArcticNet (Arctic Change 2014) Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (Inuit Health Survey National Steering Committee) and Inuit Circumpolar Council-Canada (ICC General Assembly, Nagoya Protocol meetings in December).
  • The IRA facilitated 6 proposal writing workshops in conjunction with NCP community tour in each of the six ISR communities.
  • The IRA coordinated and managed a Reindeer Harvest that involved training youth and adults and distributing meat regionally to all six communities.

Synopsis (2013-2014)

Abstract

All work under this project was completed in 2013-14 by the Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) at the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation (IRC). This included activities such as developing a Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) promotional brochure and an edition of the Inuvialuit Research Newsletter, and conducting a community tour to all six Inuvialuit communities in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) to share information with community members about. The IRA has found that conducting this work is essential to informing Inuvialuit of what NCP does and what the IRA does in relation to the NCP and its mandate. IRC believes it is important for Inuvialuit beneficiaries to know about northern food security and contaminant messaging, as it has a long-lasting impact on the North and how Inuit make informed dietary choices. Additionally, the Inuvialuit Research Newsletter informs beneficiaries of research in the ISR and other Inuit regions in Canada on an annual basis. The newsletter informs beneficiaries of NCP-related work and provides a venue for NCP researchers to share their experiences about working in the Inuit regions. This year’s publication outlined research that took place in 2013. The brochure will no doubt help the IRA to better explain the program and the roles of the regional committees and management committee to frontline workers and communities.

Key messages

  • IRC now has a promotional brochure that can be shared with frontline workers and community members to better promote the NCP and the work that IRC does through the Inuit Research Advisor.
  • The Inuvialuit Research Newsletter continues to have a far-reaching impact in the ISR as it is the only publication that informs beneficiaries of research in the region and throughout other Canadian Inuit regions.
  • The community tour continues to be the way that the IRA engages and communicate what NCP and the IRA program do annually. It is one of the main ways the IRA solicits recommendations and discussions about research in the region.

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Coordination, participation and communication: evolving Inuit Research Advisor responsibilities in Nunatsiavut for the benefit of Inuit and their communities

Project leader:

Carla Pamak, Nunatsiavut Inuit Research Advisor, Nunatsiavut Government, Nain, NL
Tel: (709) 922-2942 ext. 225; Fax: (709) 922-2931


Project team:

Tom Sheldon, Rodd Laing, and Liz Pijogge, Nunatsiavut Government

Duration: 2011- present


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) and ArcticNet have co-funded an Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) in each of the four Inuit land claim regions of the Arctic - the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Nunavut, Nunavik, and Nunatsiavut. These four regional representatives are a first step in a more coordinated approach to community involvement in Arctic science and represent a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic research. In addition to the Nunatsiavut IRA’s ongoing broad objectives and responsibilities, the IRA will continue to help coordinate the operation of the Nain Research Centre and continue to communicate research-related information to Inuit communities, regional audiences, and researchers. The IRA will also continue to engage directly in community-driven, action-oriented research programs, such as the community freezer program in Nain and associated youth outreach, while helping to expand this program to other Nunatsiavut communities.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Abstract:

The Inuit Research Advisor for Nunatsiavut continues to serve as the first step in a coordinated approach to community involvement of Arctic science, representing a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science. The Nunatsiavut Government (NG) encourages researchers to consult with Inuit Community Governments in the 5 Nunatsiavut communities, Rigolet, Makkovik, Postville, Hopedale and Nain, as well as NG departments in developing more community based research proposals. Comprehensive reviews of proposals are initiated involving appropriate NG departments, Inuit Community Government(s)/Corporation(s). Together with IRAs in the other Inuit regions of Canada, the Nunatsiavut IRA works towards achieving a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science in the region. In addition to NCP support, the program is co-funded by ArcticNet and the Nunatsiavut Government.

Key messages:

  • The IRA co-coordinates the Nunatsiavut Government Research Office, serving as the first point of contact for all researchers conducting work in Nunatsiavut and requiring contact with or assistance from the Nunatsiavut Government
  • The IRA is the Chair and administrator of the Nunatsiavut Government Research Advisory Committee (NGRAC). The IRA has communicated with over 34 researchers from 1st April 2015 to 31st March 2016. This year the IRA has chaired 12 NGRAC meetings one of which was a face to face meeting in Nain
  • The IRA served as liaison, contact and assistant to research projects taking place in Nunatsiavut. This assistance ranged from linking the researchers with appropriate individuals and/or organizations such as NG departments and Inuit Community Governments in Nunatsiavut to providing input on research proposals and plans.
  • The IRA has also served as liaison for partners such asInuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada, Nunatsiavut Inuit Community Governments/ Corporations, researchers, students, and other organizations.

Synopsis (2014-15)

Abstract:

The Inuit Research Advisor for Nunatsiavut continues to serve as the first step in a more coordinated approach to community involvement and coordination of Arctic science and represent a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science.  The Nunatsiavut Government (NG) encourages researchers to consult with Inuit Community Governments in the 5 Nunatsiavut communities, Rigolet, Makkovik, Postville, Hopedale and Nain, as well as NG departments in developing more community based research proposals.  Comprehensive reviews of proposals are initiated involving appropriate NG departments, Inuit Community Government(s)/Corporation(s). Together with IRAs in the other Inuit regions of Canada, the Nunatsiavut IRA works towards achieving a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science in the region. In addition to NCP support, the program is co-funded by ArcticNet and the Nunatsiavut Government.

Key messages:

  • The IRA co-coordinates the Nunatsiavut Government Research Office, serving as the first point of contact for all researchers conducting work in Nunatsiavut and requiring contact with or assistance from the Nunatsiavut Government
  • The IRA is the Chair and administrator of the Nunatsiavut Government Research Advisory Committee (NGRAC). The IRA has communicated with over 44 researchers from 1st April 2014 to 31st March 2015.  This year the IRA has chaired 10 NGRAC meetings, one of which was a face to face meeting in Nain
  • The IRA served as liaison, contact and assistant to research projects taking place in Nunatsiavut.  This assistance ranged from linking the researchers with appropriate individuals and/or organizations such as NG departments and Inuit Community Governments in Nunatsiavut to providing input on research proposals and plans.
  • The IRA has also served as liaison for partners such as Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada, Nunatsiavut Inuit Community Governments/ Corporations, researchers, students, and other organizations.

Synopsis (2013-2014)

Abstract

The Inuit Research Advisor (IRA) for Nunatsiavut continues to serve as the first step in a more coordinated approach to community involvement and coordination of Arctic science. The Nunatsiavut Government (NG) encourages researchers to consult with Inuit Community Governments in the 5 Nunatsiavut communities, Rigolet, Makkovik, Postville, Hopedale and Nain, as well as NG departments in developing more community based research proposals. Comprehensive reviews of proposals are initiated involving appropriate NG departments, Inuit Community Government(s)/Corporation(s).

Together with IRAs in the other Inuit regions of Canada, the Nunatsiavut IRA works towards achieving a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science in the region. In addition to NCP support, the program is co-funded by ArcticNet and the Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments.

Key Messages

  • The IRA co-coordinates the Nunatsiavut Government Research Office, serving as the first point of contact for all researchers conducting work in Nunatsiavut and requiring contact with or assistance from the Nunatsiavut Government.
  • The IRA is the Chair and administrator of the Nunatsiavut Government Research Advisory Committee (NGRAC). The IRA communicated with over 37 researchers betweenApril 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014 and chaired 10 NGRAC meetings.
  • The IRA, along with other members of the Nunatsiavut Health and Environment Review Committee travelled to the 5 Nunatsiavut communities to meet with high school students and community members to inform them of research in the area of contaminants. This committee also reviewed NCP-funded proposals for the region.
  • The IRA served as liaison, contact and assistant to research projects taking place in Nunatsiavut. This assistance ranged from linking the researchers with appropriate individuals and/or organizations such as NG departments and Inuit Community Governments in Nunatsiavut to providing input on research proposals and plans.
  • The IRA has also served as liaison for partners such as Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada, Nunatsiavut Inuit Community Governments/ Corporations, International Polar Year (IPY) researchers, students, and other organizations.

Synopsis (2012-2013):

The Inuit Research Advisor for Nunatsiavut continues to serve as the first step in a more coordinated approach to community involvement and coordination of Arctic science and represents a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science. The Nunatsiavut Government (NG) encourages researchers to consult with Inuit Community Governments in the five Nunatsiavut communities (Rigolet, Makkovik, Postville, Hopedale and Nain) as well as NG departments in developing more community based research proposals. Comprehensive reviews of proposals are initiated involving appropriate NG departments and Inuit Community Government(s)/Corporation(s). Together with IRAs in the other Inuit regions of Canada, the Nunatsiavut IRA works towards achieving a new way of knowledge sharing and engagement of Inuit in Arctic science in the region. In addition to NCP support, the program is co-funded by ArcticNet and the Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments.

Key Messages

  • The IRA co-manages the Nain Research Centre, serving as the first point of contact for all researchers conducting work in Nunatsiavut and requiring contact with or assistance from the Nunatsiavut Government
  • The IRA is the Chair and administrator of the Nunatsiavut Government Research Advisory Committee (NGRAC). The IRA has communicated with over 30 researchers this fiscal year. This year the IRA has chaired 8 NGRAC meetings
  • The IRA, along with other members of the Nunatsiavut Health and Environment Review committee, traveled to the five Nunatsiavut communities to meet with high school students and community members to inform them of research projects relating to contaminants, environment and health. The NHERC also reviewed NCP funded proposals for the region.
  • The IRA served as liaison, contact and assistant to research projects taking place in Nunatsiavut. This assistance ranged from linking the researchers with appropriate individuals and/or organizations such as NG departments and Inuit Community Governments in Nunatsiavut to providing input on research proposals and plans.
  • The IRA has also served as liaison for partners such as Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) Canada, Nunatsiavut Inuit Community Governments/ Corporations, International Polar Year (IPY), researchers, students, and other organizations.

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Building Continued Capacity Among Inuit Research Advisors

Project Leader: Kendra Tagoona, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Ottawa, Ontario,
P: 613 238 8181 x 239, F: 613 234 1991
E: ktagoona@itk.ca

Project Team:

  • Betsy Palliser, Kativik Regional Government;
  • Kiah Hachey, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.;
  • Pitsey Moss-Davies, Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada;
  • Shannon O’Hara, Inuvialuit Regional Corporation
  • Carla Pamak, Nunatsiavut Government

Northern Regions Included in the Study: Canada’s North

Project Duration: 2013-2014


Abstract

This past year, the Inuit Research Advisors (IRAs) identified a need for further training and outreach. Each year, the IRAs hold either a face–to-face meeting, or take part in training relating to the skills needed for work expected of them from their funders: NCP, ArcticNet and the Nasivvik Centre for Inuit Health and Changing Environments. The focus of the 2013 training workshop, held in Kuujjuaq, QC, was on developing better presentation skills. This workshop helped the IRAs prepare for upcoming speeches at the NCP Results Workshop (September 2013) and the ArcticNet Annual Scientific Meeting in Halifax (December 2013). Public speaking events are important avenues for the IRAs to spread awareness of who they are, and their roles within their regions. The IRAs also developed a national poster targeted to both researchers and Inuit, which has been distributed to every community in all four regions. They also developed a national brochure to hand out at conferences and events.

Key Messages

  • An expert-led training workshop provided the IRAs with better presentation skills.
  • Posters and a brochure were developed for distribution to all Inuit communities in the IRAs’ home regions.

Project Summary (2013-2014)

This year, the Inuit Research Advisors (IRAs) are participating in a joint project to enhance their communication, outreach and training capabilities in their respective regions and nationally. These include developing an IRA poster that can be displayed in all of the communities in areas where community members and visiting researchers may see and learn about the IRA position. We are also working with other programs like ArcticNet and Nasivvik to continue with our training.

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Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee

Project leader:

Karla Letto, Contaminants Specialist, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Iqaluit, NU

Romani Makkik, Research Advisor, Department of Social and Cultural Development, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Iqaluit, NU
Tel: (867) 975-4926; Fax: (867) 975-4949; rmakkik@tunngavik.com

Project team:

Wanda Joy, Michele LeBlanc-Havard, Department of Health, Government of Nunavut; Karlene Napayok, Denise Baikie, Angela Young, Department of Environment, Government of Nunavut; Zoya Martin, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Simon Smith, Tamara Fast, and Nunavut General Monitoring Program Representative, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; Eric Loring, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami; Andrew Dunford, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.; Jamal Shirley, Nunavut Research Institute; Jackie Price, Qikiqtaaluk Wildlife Board; HTA Representative, Resolute Bay Hunters and Trappers Organization

Duration: 2014- present


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee (NECC) was established in 2000 to provide a forum for the review and discussion, through a sociocultural lens, of Nunavut-based Northern Contaminants program (NCP)-funded projects and proposals seeking NCP funding.  Through its sociocultural review of all Nunavut-based NCP proposals, the committee ensures Northern and Inuit interests are being served by scientific research conducted in Nunavut. In addition, the NECC aims to serve as a resource to Nunavummiut for long-range contaminants information in Nunavut.  The committee supports the communication of NCP-related information in Nunavut to ensure Nunavummiut are informed about NCP research activities and findings.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Abstract

The Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee (NECC) was struck in May 2000 to provide a forum to review and discuss, through a social/cultural lens, Nunavut-based NCP-funded projects and proposals seeking NCP funding. Through its social/cultural review of all Nunavut-based NCP proposals, the committee ensures northern and Inuit interests are being served by scientific research conducted in Nunavut. In addition, the NECC aims to serve as a resource to Nunavummiut for long-range contaminants information in Nunavut. NECC's co-chairs attended the NCP Management Committee meetings in Ottawa in April 2015 and October 2015 and the NCP Results Workshop in December 2015. NECC participated in the Wildlife Contaminants Workshop at the Nunavut Arctic College's (NAC) Iqaluit campus in September 2015 by contributing a talk to the seminar portion of the workshop. NECC provided feedback to NCP researchers on summary reports intended for community dissemination, met face-to-face with NCP-funded researchers to discuss their respective proposals/projects, and attended lectures at NAC presented by NCP researchers. NECC also hosted a productive social/cultural review of NCP proposals on Feb 23-24, 2016 in Iqaluit. Sixteen people participated in the face-to-face meeting, including 3 Nunavut community members for which the NECC provided travel support to attend this review meeting in Iqaluit. A total of 29 NU-based proposals were reviewed. Comprehensive feedback was provided by NECC's co-chairs to all project leaders seeking NCP funding for projects taking place in Nunavut.

Key Messages

  • Through its social/cultural review of all Nunavut-based NCP proposals, the Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee (NECC) ensures northern and Inuit interests are being served by scientific research conducted in Nunavut.
  • The NECC aims to serve as a resource to Nunavummiut for long-range contaminants information in Nunavut.

Synopsis (2014-15)

Abstract:

The Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee (NECC) was struck in May 2000 to provide a forum to review and discuss, through a social-cultural lens, Nunavut-based NCP-funded projects and proposals seeking NCP funding.  Through its social-cultural review of all Nunavut-based NCP proposals, the committee ensures northern and Inuit interests are being served by scientific research conducted in Nunavut.In addition, the NECC aims to serve as a resource to Nunavummiut for long-range contaminants information in Nunavut. NECC’s AANDC and NTI co-chairs attended the NCP Management Committee meetings in Ottawa in April 2014 and September 2014 and the Arctic Change Conference in December 2014. NECC participated in the annual Wildlife Contaminants Workshop (C-11) at the Nunavut Arctic College’s (NAC) Iqaluit campus in Oct. 2014 by contributing talks to the seminar portion of the workshop. NECC provided feedback to NCP researchers on summary reports intended for community dissemination, met face-to-face with NCP-funded researchers to discuss their respective proposals/projects and attended lectures at NAC presented by NCP researchers. NECC also hosted a productive social-culture review of NCP proposals on Feb 17-18, 2015 in Iqaluit.  Fifteen people participated in the face-to-face meeting and 26 NU-based proposals were reviewed. Comprehensive feedback was provided by NECC’s co-chairs to all proje ct leaders seeking NCP funding for projects taking place in Nunavut.  A comprehensive consultation summary was provided to the NCP Secretariat to inform funding decisions at the April 2015 NCP Management Committee meeting.

 Key messages:

  • Through its social-cultural review of all Nunavut-based NCP proposals, the Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee (NECC) ensures northern and Inuit interests are being served by scientific research conducted in Nunavut.
  • The NECC aims to serve as a resource to Nunavummiut for long-range contaminants information in Nunavut

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Northern Contaminants Researcher - Nunatsiavut

Project Leader:

Liz Pijogge, Northern Contaminants Researcher, Nunatsiavut Government, Nain
Tel: (709) 922-2942; Fax: (709) 922-2931; Email: liz.pijogge@nunatsiavut.com

Project Team:

Tom Sheldon, Eva Obed, and Rodd Laing, Nunatsiavut Government; Derek Muir, Environment and Climate Change Canada; Dorothy Angnatok, Community Freezer Outreach Coordinator

Duration: ongoing


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Nunatsiavut Northern Contaminants Researcher (NCR) works inter-departmentally and across communities, in part through the Nunatsiavut Government Research Advisory Committee (NGRAC), to help Inuit of Nunatsiavut better understand contaminants within the region and implications for Inuit health and wellbeing. In partnership with the NGRAC, the NCR disseminates essential information on contaminants and research projects throughout the region and is the first point of contact for contaminants-related information. All Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) research projects in Nunatsiavut are coordinated through the NCR at the Nain Research Centre on an annual basis. Funding from the NCP supports the continuation of the NCR position, as well as the NGRAC, and ensures that there is a trusted, consistent point of contact who will actively engage Nunatsiavimmiut. For example, in partnership with the Nain Research Centre and schools in Nunatsiavut, the NCR will continue to implement Youth Capacity Building and Education Modules. NCP funding for the NCR will also complement ongoing or previously implemented NCP research programs, including water, air, ringed seal, and Arctic char monitoring. All monitoring programs include a traditional knowledge component that is essential to properly understand trends and issues. Finally, the NCR’s on-going activities will build on the capacity that has been developed in the region to facilitate an even greater level of management and ownership of research in Nunatsiavut.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Abstract:

During 2015-2016, the Northern Contaminants Researcher (NCR) job became vacant when the original Principal Investigator Colin Webb took on other employment within the Nunatsiavut Government. Liz Pijogge was hired as the NCR. The NCR is the first point of contact for contaminant related information in the Nunatsiavut region. The NCR worked directly with many contaminant-related research projects as well as other research projects that related to the well-being of Nunatsiavummiut. Communication was achieved through direct trips to the communities of Nunatsiavut, informing Nunatsiavummiut of the contaminant-related research projects taking place, results produced so far and discussed any potential future research projects. This direct interaction allowed local community members to ask questions and get information directly from the NCR. Other forms of communication included social media, in-person interactions and community meetings. The NCR also sits on the Nunatsiavut Research Advisory Committee (NGRAC) and the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) Management Committee to review research project proposals submitted to Nunatsiavut and NCP.

Key Messages:

  • The NCR contacted each of the project leaders of NCP projects to introduce herself, gain a better understanding of the specific project, and ensure that the successful NCP programs in Nunatsiavut continue.
  • The NCR, along with the Inuit Research Advisor (IRA), visited the Environment Canada facility in Burlington, Ontario to learn how seal and fish samples are processed and analyzed, to meet staff with our partners and to further our research relationship for future projects. This provided excellent training and capacity building for the Nunatsiavut region.
  • The NCR communicated information about benefits of traditional food and encouraged Nunatsiavummiut to continue to consume traditional food.
  • The NCR, in partnership with the IRA while the position was vacant, worked with a wide variety of contaminant related projects to build capacity in Nunatsiavut, allowing Nunatsiavut to take leadership in these areas. This included capacity building in Nunatsiavut Government employees, harvesters and youth, relating to contaminants and associated research processes.

Synopsis (2014-2015)

Abstract:

During 2014-2015, the Northern Contaminants Researcher (NCR) continued to be the first point of contact for contaminant related information in the Nunatsiavut region. The NCR worked directly with many contaminant-related research projects as well as other research projects that related to the wellbeing of Nunatsiavummiut. Communication was achieved through direct trips to the communities of Nunatsiavut, informing Nunatsiavummiut of the contaminant-related research projects taking place, results produced so far and discussed any potential future research projects. This direct interaction allowed local community members to ask questions and get information directly from the NCR. Other forms of communication used included social media, the Nain Research Centre website and community meetings. The NCR also sits on the Nunatsiavut Research Advisory Committee (NGRAC) and the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) Management Committee to review research project proposals submitted to Nunatsiavut and NCP. Environment department meetings were attended to identify and overcome challenges, build better communication and collaboration and improve intradepartmental sharing. NCP management committee meetings were attended in Ottawa and Yellowknife. Teleconferences and meetings took place to funding opportunities for training and education of Labrador Inuit.

Key Messages:

  • The NCR communicated information about benefits of traditional food and encouraged Nunatsiavummiut to continue to consume traditional food, as the benefits outweigh any risk associated with the current contaminant load that the food might contain.
  • The NCR worked with a wide variety of contaminant related projects to build capacity in Nunatsiavut, allowing Nunatsiavut to take leadership in these areas. This included capacity building in Nunatsiavut Government employees, harvesters and youth, relating to contaminants and associated research processes.
  • The NCR continued to work with researchers traveling to Nunatsiavut to ensure they understand the concerns, culture and traditions of the Inuit in Nunatsiavut. Also, the NCR encouraged the researchers to become more involved within the communities, including hiring and training local residents, helping to build capacity within our region.
  • The NCR worked in conjunction with the Inuit Research Advisor and the Youth Outreach Worker to host community-wide traditional food events, which include a healthy traditional meal in the Nain Research Centre, while providing an informal environment for residents to access research and contaminate-related information.
  • In conjunction with an educator and staff at the Nain Research Centre, the NCR developed education modules that explain contaminants in the Nunatsiavut environment, while ensuring they were compatible with the Newfoundland and Labrador curriculum
  • In partnership with the Youth Outreach Program, harvesters and researchers, the NCR collected and processed samples for NCP projects, building capacity and reducing costs for the research projects.
  • Worked with a wide variety of projects to build capacity in Nunatsiavut, allowing Nunatsiavut to take leadership in these areas in the future and teach employees and youth about how contaminants make their way into our environment and the impact this may have on species in the region.

Synopsis (2013-2014)

Abstract

During 2013-2014, the Northern Contaminants Researcher (NCR) continued with work that informs the public about contaminants-related research and other projects regarding the wellbeing of Nunatsiavummiut. The NCR also continued to educate and communicate about contaminants information, research activities, the benefits of wild foods and any health-related issues that affect Nunatsiavummiut on a daily basis. Communication was achieved through a variety of means, including a community tour that informed Nunatsiavummiut of the contaminant-related research projects taking place, results produced so far and explained any upcoming research projects. Other forms of communication used included social media, the Nain Research Center website and community meetings. A tour of Nunatsiavut’s five communities allowed for the dissemination of contaminants information and results as well as an opportunity for each community to raise concerns relating to contaminants and research in their region. Community feasts were held at the Nain Research Centre to promote the benefits of traditional food, while providing an informal opportunity to discuss concerns about contaminants and research. Finally, the NCR assisted many researchers and research projects by connecting them to local residents.

Key Messages

  • The NCR worked with a wide variety of contaminant-related projects to build capacity in Nunatsiavut, including among Nunatsiavut Government employees, harvesters and youth.
  • The NCR continued to work with researchers traveling to Nunatsiavut to ensure they understand the concerns, culture and traditions of the Inuit in Nunatsiavut. Also, the NCR encouraged the researchers to become more involved within the communities, including hiring and training local residents, helping to build capacity within our region.
  • The Nunatsiavut Health and Environment Research Committee traveled to the communities of Nunatsiavut to discuss and disseminate information relating to contaminants, research and the Northern Contaminants Program. This also provided an opportunity for feedback from the individual communities relating to contaminants and related research.
  • The NCR worked in conjunction with the Inuit Research Advisor and the Youth Outreach Worker to host community-wide traditional food events, which include a healthy traditional meal in the Nain Research Centre, while providing an informal environment for residents to access research and contaminate-related information.
  • In partnership with the Youth Outreach Program, harvesters and researchers, the NCR collected and processed samples for NCP projects, building capacity and reducing costs for the research projects.

Synopsis (2012-2013):

Abstract

During 2012-2013, the Northern Contaminants Researcher (NCR) continued to communicate and educate Nunatsiavummiut about contaminants information, research activities, the benefits of wild foods and any health related issues that affect them on a daily basis. This communication took place using written documents, social media, posters, various media tools and through community feasts. Funding from the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) also allowed the Nunatsiavut Health and Environment Research Committee (NHERC) to travel to five Nunatsiavut communities to inform residents about contaminate related issues, including ongoing and upcoming NCP research projects. These meetings also allowed the NHERC to understand the needs and concerns of individual communities within Nunatsiavut. Contaminant results from the Inuit Health Survey (2008) were presented and discussed with Nunatsiavut communities through the NCR and the Director of Environment for the Nunatsiavut Government, Tom Sheldon. The NCR, through the Nain Research Center, also provided information about the benefits of traditional food while hosting community feasts that promoted country food, including seal, char, caribou, ducks and partridges to the residents of Nain. Furthermore, the NCR assisted many visiting researchers with work that is new or ongoing in the Nunatsiavut region, connecting researchers with residents.

Key Messages

  • The Northern Contaminants Researcher communicated information about benefits of country food and encouraged Nunatsiavummiut to continue to consume country food, as the benefits outweigh any risk associated with the current contaminant load that the country food may contain. Results from the Inuit Health Survey were used as a tool to emphasize these benefits and risks.
  • The NHERC traveled to the five Nunatsiavut communities, presenting to both the community and schools, to inform residents on past, current and upcoming research projects, especially those relating to contaminants. This allowed for questions and feedback from residents on contaminants and research projects of concern within their region. Areas of concern for most communities were contaminants in country food, including char, ringed seal and caribou, as well as the downstream effects of the Muskrat Falls Hydroelectric Development.
  • The NCR continued to work with researchers traveling to Nunatsiavut to ensure they understand the concerns, culture and traditions of the Inuit in Nunatsiavut. Also, the NCR encouraged the researchers to become more involved within the communities, including hiring and training local residents, helping to build capacity within our region.
  • The NCR worked in conjunction with the Inuit Research Advisor and the Research Outreach Coordinator to host community-wide traditional food events, which include a healthy traditional meal (caribou soup, char, seal) in the Nain Research Centre, while browsing through research and contaminant-related information.
  • In partnership with the Research Outreach Coordinator, harvesters and researchers, the NCR collected and processed samples for NCP projects, building capacity and reducing costs for the research projects.

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Wildlife Contaminants Workshop – building contaminants research capacity in Nunavut

Project Leaders:

Jamal Shirley, Manager, Research Design: Nunavut Research Institute, Nunavut Arctic College, Iqaluit, NU,
Tel: (867) 979 7280; E-mail: Jamal.shirley@arcticcollege.ca

Jason Carpenter, Senior Instructor: Environmental Technology Program, Nunavut Arctic College, Iqaluit, NU
Tel: (867) 979 7285; E-mail: Jason.Carpenter@ArcticCollege.ca

Mary Gamberg, Research Scientist, Gamberg Consulting, Whitehorse, YT 
Tel: (867)-334-3360; Email: mary.gamberg@gmail.com

Jennifer Provencher, Department of Biology, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS
E-mail: jennifpro@gmail.com

Project Team:

Amie Black, Birgit Braune, Grant Gilchrist, and Robert Letcher, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Ottawa, ON; Chris Furgal, Trent University, Peterborough. ON; Mark Mallory, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS; Derek Muir, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Burlington, ON; Mary Ellen Thomas, Nu navut Research Institute, Iqaluit, NU

Duration: 2014- present


Project Summary (2016-2017)

This project will deliver and further develop an integrated contaminants communication and research training program to students of Nunavut Arctic College’s Environmental Technology Program. Specifically, a workshop will be offered on contaminants knowledge in the context of ecosystem and wildlife health. The workshop will involve interactive lectures, lab activities, and discussions with researchers, hunters, and decision makers. Through this training, students will learn a variety of techniques to perceive, assess, manage, and communicate the potential health risks posed by contaminants in Northern country foods. To ensure that traditional knowledge and Inuit perspectives on contaminants are integrated in the lessons, community members from local groups (e.g. Hunters and Trappers Organisation, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.) will be invited to participate in the workshop. The long-term goals of the project are to build a core understanding of contaminants research among Nunavut’s future environmental managers and decision makers, and to increase their capacity to effectively interpret, evaluate, and convey contaminants information. A secondary component of the project will be a formal workshop assessment to increase our understanding of how students learn and retain information with the goal of improving future content and delivery. This portion of the project aims to inform the assessment of best practices in contaminants communication and engagement in a Northern context.


Synopsis (2015-2016)

Abstract:

We delivered an environmental contaminants training workshop for students in Nunavut Arctic College’s Environmental Technology Program in Iqaluit, September 26 to October 5, 2015. The workshop employed classroom lectures, field trips, group discussions, and interactive laboratory activities, to teach students core concepts, issues, and methodology related to study and assessment of chemical contaminants in the Arctic environment from both scientific and Inuit perspectives. Students learned directly from Northern Contaminants Program research scientists how contaminant trend monitoring programs are designed and conducted. Students also received hands-on training in specific methods for marine bird and seal tissue sampling, and they participated in a field activity to learn techniques for measuring chemical dispersion in aquatic environments. Students also learned traditional Inuit techniques for harvesting, flensing and butchering ringed seals from a local wildlife expert, and they took part in a unique dialogue with an experienced elder/hunter about traditional methods to assess animal health and to determine the safety and quality of country foods. Throughout the workshop students learned methods for assessing health risks posed by contaminants in country foods, and participated in developing strategies to communicate contaminants research and health information to specific target audiences in Nunavut. A formal assessment of the workshop’s impact found that student self-assessed knowledge of and ability to communicate about contaminant issues increased between the start and end of workshop, and that the students’ awareness and understanding, and ability to apply knowledge related to contaminant exposure and health risks increased through their participation in the workshop.

Key messages:

  • The Wildlife Contaminants Workshop was held at the Nunavut Arctic College as part of the Environmental Technology Program in September 2015.
  • Students, Elders, community members and researchers were involved in the workshop with the purpose of increasing the group’s knowledge and understanding of contaminants in northern wildlife.
  • The 2015 workshop also included an evaluation component that aimed to assess the workshops ability to increase student understanding and communication skills of northern contaminants studies.

Synopsis (2014-2015)

Abstract

The Northern Contaminants Program (NCP)’s blueprint for communications, capacity and outreach recommends that that the main audience for NCP communication efforts be frontline workers whom community members would regularly turn to for answers to their questions related to contaminants. We delivered an integrated contaminants communication and research training program for students of the Nunavut Arctic College’s Environmental Technology Program and members the Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee; both of whom are critical “frontline” workers engaged in communicating contaminants information. Members of the local HTO and Wildlife Branch also contributed to the training session. The training combined lectures, interactive lab activities, and group discussions. Students learned how contaminants trend monitoring programs are designed and conducted, are trained in specific methods for wildlife tissue sampling, and discussed contaminants communication strategies for specific target audiences in Nunavut. The training also mobilized expertise from two long term NCP supported monitoring programs, and engaged experts from the community to better link students with active researchers in the north. The long term goals of the project are to increase the capacity of Nunavut’s future environmental practitioners to effectively communicate contaminants information to community members, and to build core understanding of contaminants research among Nunavut’s future environmental managers and decision makers.

Key messages: 

  • The Wildlife Contaminants Workshop was held at the Nunavut Arctic College during the week of September 29th to October 6th, 2014. Students from the Environmental Technology Program (first and second year), Nunavut Environmental Contaminants Committee and the wider science community in Iqaluit took part in the workshop. This year the main components covered were contaminant research in caribou and marine birds. Both marine birds and caribou dissections were done as part of the workshop.
  • In total 26 students took part in the workshop
  • Members from five different science/wildlife groups in Iqaluit participated in the workshop
  • Ten students were paid to complete dissection over the weekend
  • Three NCP projects were highlighted during the workshop (Gamberg – caribou, Richardson – water monitoring, Provencher – marine birds).
  • Complete surveys were collected from 21 students that are currently being analysed as part of a program assessment component that will be expanded in 2015-2016

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Synthesis of Mercury Research for the Sahtú Region

Project Leader:

Shelagh Montgomery, Yellowknife NT

Tel: (867)-669-2092; Email: Shelagh.Montgomery@arcadis.com

Project Team:

Deborah Simmons and Joe Hanlon, Sahtú Renewable Resources Board

Abstract:

In response to community concerns raised about the status of mercury in the environment of the Sahtú Region, NWT, a literature review was undertaken to summarize research and monitoring carried out over the years. A multitude of studies have been completed or are ongoing; primarily, on fish, and to a lesser extent caribou and human health. Studies of mercury in biota are generally indicative of levels that are not of immediate human health concern, although, in some instances there are public health advisories that recommend limiting intake of certain predatory fish. Studies to date indicate caribou meat does not accumulate high levels of mercury.

Gaps related to mercury research in the region were identified:

·         There is no process in place to routinely validate existing consumption advisories.

·         Periodic health risk assessments are required.

·         There is a lack of a coordinated approach to research and monitoring.

·         Communities should be better involved in developing projects and face-to-face communications with residents about results should be improved.

Key messages:

·         Studies of mercury in biota are generally indicative of concentrations that are not of immediate human health concern, although, in some instances there are public health advisories that recommend limiting intake of certain predatory fish. Studies to date indicate caribou meat does not accumulate high levels of mercury.

·         A mechanism needs to be developed for the routine and periodic evaluation of existing or outdated public health advisories.

·         Reporting back to communities about the multitude of research studies carried out in the region and communicating risks should be improved.

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Learning about ringed seal health from contaminants science and Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit: an educational workshop in Resolute, Nunavut

Project leaders

Dominique Henri, Wildlife Science and Traditional Knowledge Specialist, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Montreal
Tel: (514) 496-9024; Email: dominique.henri@canada.ca

Magali Houde, Research Scientist, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Montreal
Tel: (514) 496-5774; Email: magali.houde@canada.ca

Project team

Rob Filipkowski, Qarmartalik School, Resolute; Derek Muir, and Amie Black, Environment and Climate Change Canada; Steven Ferguson, Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Jennifer Provencher, Carleton University; David Yurkowski, University of Windsor

Duration: 2016-present


Project Summary (2016-2017)

This project addresses a shared interest among Nunavummiut and scientific researchers in enhancing communications and community capacity-building related to contaminants research on ringed seals. In Fall 2016, a two-day educational workshop will take place in Resolute, Nunavut, to engage youth, Elders, community members (e.g. the local Hunters and Trappers Organization), and researchers in learning about ringed seals from both Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit and scientific perspectives. The purpose and aim of this workshop is twofold. First, it will allow scientists researching contaminants in ringed seals to share information about their work with Northern residents, particularly youth. Second, it will provide an opportunity for Inuit Elders to share with students their knowledge of seal ecology and traditional methods for butchering seals, preparing seal skin, and identifying abnormalities in harvested game. This event will include interactive presentations by researchers, as well as seal dissection and seal skin preparation activities guided by local Elders. The project will result in a learning and capacity-building opportunity for Northern youth. A series of surveys and discussions will identify best communication practices and inform the development of innovative methods for community engagement around contaminants monitoring in wildlife.

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NWT Regional Contaminants Committee (NWT RCC)

Project leaders:

Emma Pike, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

Tim Heron, Chair, Northwest Territories Environmental Contaminants Committee, NWT Metis Nation
Tel: (867) 872-2770; Fax: (867) 872-3586

Project team:

Representatives on NWT RCC from: Dene Nation, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Inuvialuit Game Council, Gwich’in Tribal Council, Sahtu Secretariat Inc., Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, Dene Council, Deh Cho First Nations, Tlicho Government, Akaitcho Territory Government, North Slave Métis Alliance, Northwest Territory Métis Nation, Aboriginal Affairs Northern Development Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, GNWT Environment & Natural Resources, GNWT Health and Social Services, and the Aurora Research Institute

Project Duration: 2013-present


Project Summary (2016-2017)

The Northwest Territories Regional Contaminants Committee (NWTRCC) advises on communication of information to residents of the Northwest Territories (NWT) on the presence and possible effects of long-range contaminants in air, land, water, fish, wildlife, and humans as part of the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP). The NWTRCC also reviews NCP proposals and participates in the development of NCP research priorities and strategic plans relevant to the NWT. The committee consists of representatives from national and regional Aboriginal partners, as well as various departments in the federal and territorial governments. The role and responsibilities of NWTRCC members include reviewing proposals and providing feedback to researchers on traditional knowledge, capacity building, communication, and consultation, as well as communicating results and reference material to community members, and being the first point of contact for community concerns. Furthermore, when Public Health Advisories are issued, NWTRCC members from the affected region are consulted on use of local traditional country foods, effective communication tools, community contacts, and other relevant information. The NWT NCP Secretariat co-ordinates internal and external communications, manages regional NCP-related activities, and is the conduit to the Government of Northwest Territories (GNWT) Health and Social Services for researchers to submit raw data to be considered for Public Health Advisories in the NWT.


Synopsis 2015-2016

Not available at the moment.


Project Summary 2014-15

The Northwest Territories Contaminants Committee (NWT RCC) advises on communication of information to residents of the Northwest Territories (NWT) on the presence and possible effects of long range contaminants in air, land, water, fish, wildlife and humans as part of the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP). 


The NWT RCC also reviews NCP proposals and participates in the development of NCP research blueprints relevant to NWT; members discuss community based contaminant concerns which may affect traditional foods and the environment.  The committee consists of representatives from national and regional Aboriginal partners, as well as various departments in the federal and territorial governments.  The network of people making up the committee is an efficient means of having discussions on how to relay information on contaminants, NCP research and their results and research initiatives between NWT communities, relevant organizations, other contaminants programs representatives and the Northern Contaminants Programs staff. The NWT RCC meets for teleconference calls and one annual in-person meeting to review all proposals submitted to the Northern Contaminants Program.  The committee compiles relevant reference materials received from the NCP Results Workshop, researchers and the NWT NCP Secretariat and provides contaminant information to NWT residents and Aboriginal governments, as well as assists residents in addressing their contaminant concerns.


Project Summary (2013-2014)

The Northwest Territories Regional Contaminants Committee (NWT RCC) advises on communication of information to residents of the Northwest Territories (NWT) on the presence and possible effects of long range contaminants in air, land, water, fish, wildlife and humans as part of the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP).

The NWTRCC also reviews NCP proposals and participates in the development of NCP research blueprints relevant to NWT; members discuss community based contaminant concerns which may affect traditional foods and the environment. The committee compiles relevant reference materials received from the NCP Results Workshop, researchers and the NWT NCP Secretariat and provides contaminant information to NWT residents and Aboriginal governments, as well as assists residents in addressing their contaminant concerns.

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